Nutrition for Bikini Competition – FOCUS LESS ON PROTEIN, AND MORE ON NUTRITIONAL DENSITY

Nutrition for Bikini Competition - Bikini competitors have to diet and exercise in the months leading up to a competition. A competitor reveals what she ate every day ahead of the competition. Her diet consisted of oats with a scoop of protein powder, green veggies with tofu or black bean burger, avocados, pinto beans, spoonfuls of peanut butter and 2 more protein shakes
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

“There is no quick fix, there is no magic pill or shake. Mindset is everything. Once you change your mind, you change your life.”

 

Name: Stefanie Dawn
Occupation: CEO of Lifestyle Doyenne
City/State/Country: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Age: 29
Height: 5’10”
Weight: 145lbs
Training: Bikini competition
Website: stefaniedawn.com
IG: @msstefaniedawn
Twitter: @boombshellmafia

 

Q: Who had to most positive influence on you growing up as a child and why?

 

I come from a family of extremely hard workers and entrepreneurs who are super supportive and encouraging. Without them, I wouldn’t be the person I am today!

 

Q: What is Bombshell Mafia?

 

When I was 19 years old I opened a small boutique salon called Bombshells Beauty Bar (“Bombshell” was a nickname I had in high school because I had no qualms about showing up in red lips and Marilyn monroe-esque platinum hair). I had the salon for eight years, and I was extremely busy and it quickly became well known for creating amazing hair.

 

About five years into that business, I knew I wanted to expand outside the salon, and do more than just hair. I wanted to run a larger company and take the Bombshell name bigger. I bought the domain name for Bombshell Mafia and got back to work in the salon because it was getting busier by the week.

 

About two years later, I started to get really burnt out from doing so much hair. I was loosing my passion for it. Long story short, I decided to sell my home, my business, my assets…everything to move to California to start fresh and focus on building Bombshell Mafia. It never happened, I stayed in Calgary.

 

“I tried to work in a few different salons, but my passion still wasn’t there. Things just were not clicking for me. I was in a funk. This is when I decided to hire a business coach and really start to focus in on what I wanted to do, and how I was going to grow a business out of the hair industry.”

 

During this time at the salon, I had also lost over 90lbs., competed in two bikini competitions and went back to school for my holistic nutrition certification, and took up a hobby of self -improvement. With the help of my coach we sat down and created a concept and programs to help other women become the best versions of themselves.

 

Everything was there, we just needed a name. I was searching through my old emails and BombshellMafia.com came up and we both decided that it was the perfect embodiment for everything I had visions of doing and creating. Now Bombshell Mafia is up and running and the main focus of my life. You can check it out at www.bombshellmafia.com

 

Q: I recently saw your pictures of your recent bikini competition where you placed 5th. Walk us through the transformation over the past year (mind, body, and soul) and what you did differently with training and diet.

 

After going through a lot of changes and trying to settle and restart my life over again, I have to admit I got really depressed. I kept trying and trying to prep for another show and I couldn’t follow through. When I had competed the last few times, it was a STRUGGLE. It took me three years to get back to the stage.

 

After that show in 2012, I started training with a well-known fitness competition “team” and developed an unhealthy mentality, including extreme eating and body image issues. When I just couldn’t keep up and perform anymore, I sought out help in other places. I hired other coaches. Failed. I fell off every wagon I was ever on. I remember just being so mad at myself.

 

I just didn’t like this person I was anymore. I decided to prep one last time just over a year ago. I was really going to DO IT this time.

 

One night, I felt all these old issues coming back. I vividly remember going to bed teary eyed praying to God to give me the strength and tools I needed to change my life, and help change the lives of others. That morning I woke up and went to pack my food for the day as usual, except as I went to grab my baggies of Mrs. Dash covered tilapia and chicken and I just couldn’t do it.

 

I was completely repulsed. This is the day my life really started to change, because my new coach wouldn’t change my program to accommodate no meat, and no one I knew really seemed to know what to do.

 

“This started my journey into vegetarian bodybuilding (eventually going vegan). I started to do my own research and go back to everything I learned in holistic nutrition and get away from all the ‘bro science’ I had subjected myself to.”

 

I started reading books like “80/10/10”, “The Starch Solution”, and “The Vegan Guide to the Galaxy”. I realized that there was actually a huge community of support I could tap into.

 

“After fully switching over to a plant-based diet, I started to feel incredible. I had an abundance of energy and strength for my workouts, I woke up in a fabulous mood, and I was starting to enjoy food.”

 

I was enjoying my life and was overjoyed to learn the impact my new vegan lifestyle had on the animals and environment. I found an amazing coach via Facebook in Australia who helped me fine tune my macros and teach me more about flexible high carb vegan dieting for competition. I was loving life, getting lean and was ready to kick some ass and take some names.

 

After finishing my eight -week program with her, I knew I wanted to compete. I knew I wanted to do it as a vegan bodybuilder, and it was time to make moves.

 

I competed in the NPC, and hired a coach with a team well-known for winning physiques. He was the only person out of five teams I contacted who would take me on as a vegan.

His diet was the complete opposite of what I had known and loved veganism.

 

“It was a low carb, high-fat, moderate protein diet. I modified a lot of things based on my own biofeedback, but I was committed.

 

I learned what my body needs, what it responds to best, and when to push and pull. This was a huge eye opener for me.”

 

Q: What did your meal plan (include vegan supplements) look like leading up to the Pro show?

 

I started off high carb with a ratio of 70/20/10 (CARB/PRO/FAT) and ended up being somewhere around 25/35/40 when I switched coaches. I started with zero supplements, and ended up having to incorporate B12, BCAAs, glutamine, and electrolytes over the last 3 months.

 

My average day consisted of:

 

  • Oats with a scoop of protein powder
  • Green veggies with tofu or black bean burger
  • Avocados
  • Pinto beans
  • Spoonfuls of peanut butter
  • 2 more protein shakes

 

Q: Best advice you ever received for bodybuilding?

 

Be consistent and persistent and go hard for yourself. No one will do the work for you. It is absolutely up to you, to make up your mind and execute your goals.

 

Q: What uncommon activity do you schedule into your daily routine?

 

Every night before bed I do 30 mins of personal development. I really feel like this needs to be a not-so-uncommon activity for everyone.

 

“I listen to audio books, watch speakers on YouTube, read, and soak in juicy jewels and golden nuggets to get me set up for the next day.”

 

This also helps keep me fresh and sharp to be able to share and pass this on to others when I know they need some extra encouragement in their lives.

 

Q: What has been the hardest obstacle for you to overcome in your life?

 

When I was younger I was overweight, I looked like a boy, I had horrible teeth and was bullied fairly often. I grew up, and was still bullied. I have heard horrible gossip and have been the subject of rumors and stories. Women can be such bitches, and men can really do some damage if they want to.

 

“One of the biggest obstacles I have dealt with, and have to STILL regularly work on, is my own value as woman and being strong and unwavering in who I am. Not letting people’s opinions sway or change me.”

 

In hindsight, most of the struggle in my life stemmed from not listening to my inner voice and letting to many outer voices in.

 

Q: What was the hardest part of going plant-based? What helped you overcome the obstacles?

 

For me, going plant based was a “light switch” type effect. For a while, I even tried to eat meat, fish, or dairy, and I just couldn’t do it. It felt so unnatural.

 

“At first it was difficult to go out with friends, but now I love the challenge and my friends have become curious about my lifestyle.”

 

A lot of them actually enjoy the veggie spots and have adapted more meatless meals into their lives. Knowing others are watching me, and my choices, and the positive effect it had on my life, makes any obstacle worth it a million times over.

 

Q: What misconceptions about vegetarianism did you have at first that are now shattered?

 

I didn’t think I was going to survive. Literally. I thought I was going to have to live a straight up granola life wearing parachute pants and be malnourished. Not only I am surviving, I am truly thriving for the first time in my life, and I’ve actually started to enjoy cooking.

 

I must say, it turns out I’m quite the vegan chef! And it turns out parachute pants are pretty damn comfortable after yoga class.

 

Q: Talk about plant-based protein and your favorite sources? What advice would you give someone struggling with the protein concept?

 

My favorite sources of plant protein are tempeh, tofu, beans, and seiten. I also like to include bean or spelt pastas.

 

“I feel so much better when I don’t focus on protein intake, but adequate calorie intake and nutritional density. If you don’t think you can perform or build muscle without high protein, try high carb for a few months.”

 

You’ll be hooked on that carb train right to “Gainsville” and you won’t look back. Don’t be afraid to try something new and challenge what you think you know.

 

Q: What’s next for you, what new goals do you have for yourself (doesn’t have to be bodybuilding related)?

 

In two weeks, I have one more Bikini competition here in Canada, and then I have decided to take a year off to build some muscle. I will continue to experiment with my diet and training to prepare for next season. It’s important to keep integrity within myself and only build up from here.

 

I’d also like to go full-time with Bombshell Mafia and help create strong minds and healthy bodies all over the world. I want to help a lot of women who are struggling like I did know that more is possible for their lives.

 

For more ideas about nutrition for bikini competition, watch this video – Full Day of Eating- ON PREP! IFBB BIKINI DIET

Author Bio:

 

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

 

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

 

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

 

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

 

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Nutrition for Bikini Competition

 

Bikini Competition Meal Plan – HOW TO EAT BEFORE A BIKINI COMPETITION

A well-crafted bikini competition meal plan can make all the difference in how well you place. You can have the best body, coach, and poses, but how you eat 14-30 days before the competition can ultimately determine your success. Your diet during this period is what pulls everything together, and ideally makes you look ripped, but not starved.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

A well-crafted bikini competition diet plan can make all the difference in how well you place.

 

You can have the best body, coach, and poses, but how you eat 14-30 days before the competition can ultimately determine your success. Your diet during this period is what pulls everything together, and ideally makes you look ripped, but not starved.

 

General Advice for Competition Prep:

 

  • follow a plant-based nutrition plan that is based on macros (carbs, protein, and fat).
  • choose meals built around a primary protein source
  • have a cheat meal every seven days
  • no cheat meal two weeks out
  • avoid alcohol, even wine
  • drink at least a gallon of water each day
  • cut out water starting the day before the show

 

Bikini Competition Meal Plan – Bikini Competition Tips from the Pros

 

Samantha Shorkey talks about her diet before a bikini competition:

 

Like most bikini competitors, to get really cut right before their competition, I eat asparagus constantly (a natural diuretic) and consumed dandelion root (another natural diuretic.)

Diuretics help to flush out the sodium and excess fluids in between skin and muscle.

 

Asparagus contains high levels of the amino acid asparagine, which not only helps to flush out the fluids but it helps rid the body of excess salts too. And salt (sodium) equals bloating—something you definitely don’t want on stage.

 

I also cut out water starting the day before my show.

 

Generally speaking in terms of diet, (whether training to compete or not), I get most of my protein from tempeh, tofu, beans and high quality, vegan protein powder. I like mixing them with hemp or brown rice protein powder.

 

My go-to starchy complex carb sources are yams, squash, quinoa, and oatmeal. For fats, I love almond butter, extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, and flax seed oil.

 

“With bikini division, there isn’t really a bulking period so I generally never allow myself to get any bigger than about 135 lbs. (I’m 5’7). I basically just add in more cardio over time and very gradual calorie reduction to lose any extra weight.”

 

Suskia Strafella describes her training for a bikini competition:

 

I start off at 6am with my morning cardio spinning/cycling of 30–45 minutes and finish off with an intense ab workout every single day. I then do my evening weight training after work.

 

“I really enjoy my cardio sessions as I have so much more energy for that being in the early AM!”

 

When it comes to my resistance training, I incorporate a lot of high reps, super sets, giant sets and barely any rest in between my sets unless I’m about to throw up! My high reps and different training techniques are quite a new method for me so let’s see how it goes with my future prep!

 

Andra Purba’s vegetarian bikini competition meal plan:

 

  • Meal 1: Half cup homemade sugar-free granola (I bake oatmeal with cinnamon and sugar-free maple syrup). For my protein shake: I blend almond milk with berries, protein powder, and peanut butter.
  • Meal 2: (post-workout) low sugar, low-carb protein shake.
  • Meal 3: Spicy buffalo tofu with sesame green beans and an apple.
  • Meal 4: Protein Bar (Quest) with some almonds.
  • Meal 5: Plain Greek yogurt with stevia, protein powder, and peanut butter.
  • Meal 6: Protein shake before bed.

 

Dr. Harriet Davis shares her training schedule for a competition:

 

  • Monday: cardio (am/pm). Gym: legs (quads, inner/outer thighs), abs
  • Tuesday: cardio (am/pm). Gym: shoulders, arms (biceps, triceps), abs
  • Wednesday: cardio (am/pm). Gym: (hump day): glutes, hamstrings.
  • Thursday: cardio (am/pm). Gym: total body workout.
  • Friday: cardio (am/pm). Gym: legs, abs, back
  • Saturday: REST DAY!
  • Sunday: cardio (am/pm). Track workout (sprints, high knees, etc)

 

Kristine Lee MacIntyre’s vegan meal plan for leaning out:

 

My meal plan for eight weeks leading up to a competition:

 

  • Meal 1: Vegan protein powder prepared with water and a half cup each frozen berries and baby spinach.
  • Meal 2: 1/3 cup oats or cream of wheat prepared with 1 cup water and half a banana, dash of cinnamon.
  • Meal 3: Vegan protein powder prepared with water and a half cup each frozen berries and baby spinach.
  • Meal 4: 4 oz tofu or other vegan protein such as tempeh, soy based ground round or veggie burgers, or white fish (such as sole, cod or halibut), 1/2 cup carbs (such as 1/2 cup sweet potato, brown rice, bulgar or quinoa) 1/2 cup greens (such as asparagus, green beans, broccoli or brussel sprouts). Remember to omit the use of seasonings containing salt and fats.
  • Meal 5: Vegan protein bar (either homemade or bought such as Square Bar, 22 Days or Vega Sport) or my homemade Vital wheat gluten muffins, and half a vegan protein shake.
  • Meal 6: 4 oz tofu or other vegan protein such as tempeh, soy based ground round or veggie burgers, or white fish (such as sole, cod or halibut), 1/2 cup carbs (such as 1/2 cup sweet potato, brown rice, bulgar or quinoa) 1/2 cup greens (such as asparagus, green beans, broccoli or brussel sprouts). Remember to omit the use of seasonings containing salt and fats.
  • Meal 7: Vegan protein shake and six natural almonds.

 

Notes:

 

  • Make sure to drink at least five to six glasses of water a day.
  • Coffee or tea with unsweetened non-dairy milk and no sweeteners.
  • I do allow myself to have one cheat meal a week limiting the calories of this meal to 400.
  • The diet does get stricter at six weeks out, and then again at two weeks out with no cheat meal.

 

Stefanie Dawn keeps her meal plan simple before competing:

 

I started off high carb with a ratio of 70/20/10 (CARB/PRO/FAT) and ended up being somewhere around 25/35/40 when I switched coaches. I started with zero supplements, and ended up having to incorporate B12, BCAAs, glutamine, and electrolytes.

 

My average day consisted of:

 

  • Oats with a scoop of protein powder
  • Green veggies with tofu or black bean burger
  • Avocados
  • Pinto beans
  • Spoonfuls of peanut butter
  • 2 more protein shakes

 

Q: What advice would you give someone struggling with the protein concept?

 

“I feel so much better when I don’t focus on protein intake, but adequate calorie intake and nutritional density. If you don’t think you can perform or build muscle without high protein, try high carb for a few months [during off season].”

 

Marzia Prince (Ms. Bikini Universe) explains why a competition diet can only be done short-term: 

 

Whether you are a meat-eater, vegetarian, or vegan, I believe a competition diet is short-term. You can’t live on that diet forever. It is missing important nutrients and calories to sustain life. It can be done only for a shoot or competition to achieve a certain look. You want to live life to the fullest and nourish your body every day.

 

“There’s definitely an advantage to being a plant-based athlete, I’m leaner and more muscular compared to when I was eating meat.”

 

I never have to worry about gaining a ton of weight on the “off-season.” I’m only 5 lbs. off from a shoot or stage. I adjust my nutrition to my goals. As a trainer, I believe the body is always changing. You are not going to look the same at 30 years-old than you do at 40 years-old. Things change. Goals change. Life changes.

 

Zoe Feuerstein shares the positive benefits of competing:

 

I’m passionate about fitness and creating positive change in my own. I’ve see the power of it my whole life.

 

“It has saved myself, and others, from downward turns in life such as addiction, depression, and loss of joy.”

 

I decided to compete because I liked the idea of having a goal that would test my limits physically, mentally, and expand my knowledge on training and nutrition. I was inspired by Layne Norton and his clients, such as Femme Fittale.

 

I was introduced to them when friends at my local gym suggest that I compete. I loved that it connected me with others in the industry and pushed me to be my own personal best.

 

For more ideas on bikini competition meal plan, watch this video – Bikini Competitor MEAL PREP

Author Bio:

 

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

 

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

 

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

 

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

 

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Bikini Competition Meal Plan

 

6 FAT-BURNING PLANT FOODS (3 WITH MORE PROTEIN THAN AN EGG)

Fat-Burning Plant Foods - The Advantage of Eating Plants - Vegetarians have an advantage over meat-eaters in terms of weight loss, because vegan staples are packed with fiber. Meanwhile, animal-based foods have zero fiber. Dairy products and eggs don’t contain fiber either, so vegans are even a step ahead of vegetarians in losing weight.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

But by counting calories, obsessing over portion sizes, and struggling to curb cravings, they’re putting way too much emphasis on the negative effects of food rather than harnessing its powerful potential. Once you stop looking at food as the “problem,” you can discover ways to make food work more effectively for you.

 

In other words, it’s important to shift your attitude about food. How you feel about food matters.

 

And it goes without saying that what kind of food you put into your body matters greatly.

 

Allow me to introduce you to a cocktail of plant-based, whole foods that can amplify your efforts in burning fat.

 

Fat-Burning Plant Foods – The Advantage of Eating Plants

 

Vegetarians have an advantage over meat-eaters in terms of weight loss, because vegan staples are packed with fiber.

 

Meanwhile, animal-based foods have zero fiber.

 

Dairy products and eggs don’t contain fiber either, so vegans are even a step ahead of vegetarians in losing weight. Why should you care about fiber?

 

By adding little-to-no calories, fiber keeps the digestive tract healthy, controls the appetite, and promotes regular bowel movements.

 

Not only does a high-fiber diet enhance weight control and improve gastrointestinal functioning, but it’s also been linked to the prevention and treatment of chronic heart disease, reduced blood pressure, reduced risk of cancer, and blood glucose control.

 

Upon review of 87 published studies, researchers reported in Nutrition Reviews that meat-free diets are highly effective for weight loss.

 

A subsequent analytical study published in the International Journal of Obesity found a strong connection between meat consumption and obesity in American adults.

 

And researchers Sabaté and Wien found that diets without meat are associated with lower BMI and lower obesity rates in both children and adults.

 

“Plant-based diets are low in energy density and high in complex carbohydrates, fiber, and water, which may increase satiety and resting energy expenditure,” they wrote in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

 

So, let’s take a closer look at six fat-burning plant foods that not only support weight loss, but actually burn fat in your body.

 

Avocado

 

Some dieters shy away from avocados, because the average one contains 21 grams of fat. But just as food isn’t your enemy, fat isn’t either … at least, not every type.

 

According to the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s Dietary Guidelines, avocados are the only fruit that has monounsaturated fat.

 

Which is the good fat that lowers cholesterol. They also contain about 80 percent dietary fiber.

 

In a study of 26 overweight adults, participants who ate half of an avocado at lunch reported increased satiation, less hunger, and less desire to overeat.

 

Numerous studies about monounsaturated fats have shown that diets rich in these foods prevent fat from accumulating around the abdomen.

 

Green Tea

 

Green tea has been called a fat-burning elixir, because it contains polyphenols that activate enzymes in your fat cells.

 

A polyphenol known as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) significantly reduces body weight and interacts with appetite control pathways.

 

With deep roots in ancient ceremonies and spiritual traditions, this tea is also powerful enough to boost metabolism.

 

Because of its thermogenic properties, green tea promotes fat oxidation, which is the process of fatty acids breaking down and releasing energy.

 

Black Beans

 

Beans are packed with fiber and low in calories, but black beans are among the best for fat burning. Dark-colored beans generally have higher amounts of phenolic compounds, which can interfere with glucose absorption and play an important role in weight management.

 

A half cup of black beans provides the body with 100 calories and 6 grams of fiber, with no cholesterol or fat. They’re also a great source of vegan protein.

 

According to a University of Colorado study, foods high in resistant starch (like black beans) help the body burn up to 24 percent more calories throughout the day. And since they’re low on the GI scale, black beans help the body metabolize fatty acids instead of letting them collect and expand.

 

Spinach

 

Many leafy green vegetables, like spinach, are low in calories and high in fiber, which makes you feel full faster and eat less. A cup of raw spinach has about 3.5 grams of fiber, which is significant because of its nutrient density and the fact that it has just eight calories per serving.

 

Recently, studies have been conducted using spinach extract, which is a concentrated liquid form of the vegetable. A Swedish experiment at Lund University studied 38 overweight women for three months and saw a 95 percent decrease in hedonic hunger and a 43 percent increase in weight loss.

 

Spinach has the power to reduce cravings because it is broken down slowly and naturally in the body, allowing the stomach to signal to the brain that it’s had enough to eat. Unlike heavily processed foods and animal products, spinach slows the digestion process enough to send and receive these signals.

 

Broccoli

 

Like spinach, broccoli is loaded with fiber and calcium, nutrients that break down fat in the body and prevent new fat from forming. Raw broccoli has four grams of fiber per half-cup serving and only 20 calories. It’s an incredibly filling vegetable that keeps your appetite at bay for hours after a meal.

 

Broccoli is also very high in vitamin C, which is often associated with boosting the immune system, but also plays a role in fat burning and weight loss.

 

Researchers who published a healthy weight loss study in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition wrote, “Individuals with adequate vitamin C status oxidize 30 percent more fat during a moderate exercise bout than individuals with low vitamin C status; thus, vitamin C-depleted individuals may be more resistant to fat mass loss.”

 

Almonds

 

Nuts are a well-known appetite suppressant, but almonds in particular are effective in burning fat in the body and maximizing digestive flow. Since almonds are low in carbohydrates, which stimulate the appetite, you can decrease your food cravings by eating about 20-25 almonds per day.

 

Interestingly, research shows that people who eat nut-rich diets excrete more fat in their stools. Because of the way almonds and pecans store lipid granules, they don’t readily absorb into the body as fat, but pass through the digestive system with ease.

 

Diet Is Only Part of the Equation

 

The process of burning body fat is a complex one, but it ultimately starts with good nutrition and is bookended with regular exercise.

 

You have probably heard of lazy sayings like, “fitness is 70 percent diet and 30 percent training,” but it’s not useful to think of it this way. You will be more effective if you keep it simple and adopt the mentality that “everything matters.”

 

Ask any top bodybuilder or athlete if they slacked in one area (e.g. diet, training, rest, etc.), and they will tell you it will throw everything off-course.

 

That said, the most effective fat-burning diet plans aren’t restrictive, but rather, inclusive of whole foods that naturally boost your metabolism, slowly break down foods, promote digestion, and keep you feeling relatively satisfied/full.

 

Action Step: Starting today, incorporate two to three servings of these fat-burning plant foods into your daily diet without changing anything else to your routine for four weeks, and see if it makes a difference.

 

Now’s the time to stop fighting food and start making it work for you.

 

For more ideas on fat-burning plant foods, watch this video – How I Lost Body Fat & Built Muscle on a Vegan Plant Based Diet

Author Bio:

 

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

 

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

 

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

 

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

 

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Fat-Burning Plant Foods for Building Muscle and Losing Fat

 

IS A VEGETARIAN DIET THE ULTIMATE FAT LOSS DIET?

Fat Loss Diet - The Proven Success of Going Vegetarian - Ample evidence abounds about the benefits of adopting a plant-based diet for weight loss. Forza, a sports nutrition company, recently published a study on weight loss that revealed that vegetarians lost weight close to twice as fast as their meat-eating subjects, losing four pounds a month instead of two.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

Carrying around a little extra weight near your midsection is no longer unusual in today’s society, but that doesn’t make it any better for your health. Yet, losing weight if a constant challenge for millions of people, and one that few seem able to conquer for good.

 

But what if there was a better way? According to many experts, the answer might be going vegetarian. In recent years, millions of people have taken meat off their plates in order to finally meet their weight loss goals, gain muscle mass and become healthier overall.

 

Numerous studies back up the effectiveness of this dietary change, adding to the accumulating evidence that a vegetarian diet might be the best way possible to blast off your unwanted fat.

 

Do the claims of a vegetarian wonder diet hold true? Let’s look at the facts.

 

Why Other Kinds of Fat Loss Diet Come Up Short

 

Thousands of people start new diets every year, but a pitiful few are seeing any real results.

 

In fact, 85% of dieters end up gaining their lost weight back within twelve months. Part of the problem comes from a faulty understanding of how weight loss works. The three diet beliefs below are widely accepted, but in truth they are likely you to lead you to long term failure in reaching your weight loss goals.

 

Cutting Out Fat: Though it seems like eating fat would lead to more around your midsection, the truth is that cutting fat from your diet is likely to be harmful to your weight loss attempts, and will leave you hungry and crabby besides.

 

Exercising Off Excess: No matter how many hours you spend walking on the treadmill, you can’t exercise enough to make up for an unhealthy diet. In fact, research has shown that exercise produces little benefit for weight loss if you don’t pair it with healthy meals, and that the kind of food you eat is actually three times more important for weight loss than physical activity.

 

Calories In, Calories Out: It’s tempting to think that all calories are created equal, but in truth, your body is more affected by the source of calories than the number. Rather than counting every calorie you consume, your time is better spent making meals with healthy, whole ingredients instead.

 

Fat Loss Diet – Benefits of Going Vegetarian for Fat Loss

 

Clearly, the results from conventional weight loss strategies leave much to be desired.

 

Thankfully, there’s a different method you can follow that produces far better results: going vegetarian.

 

The idea isn’t as uncommon as you might think. Studies have estimated that over 22.8 million people (10 percent of US adults) are vegetarian, and their weight loss statistics deserve a second look. In a country where over 65% of people are overweight or obese, vegetarians tend to weigh 3-20% less than regular eaters.

 

Part of the reason for this difference is because a healthy vegetarian diet tends to lead to a healthier weight, even without other lifestyle changes.

 

The health benefits of adopting a vegetarian lifestyle go beyond weight loss. Vegetarians tend to have lower cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, fewer cases of diabetes, dementia and rheumatoid arthritis, to name a few.

 

A big reason for the benefits of a vegetarian diet is that you naturally swap out high calorie, fatty meats and instead fill up on fiber-filled fruits and vegetables that keep you full without weighing you down.

 

Plant-based foods are full of nutrients and used as efficient fuel by your body. Because they rarely make it into long term fat storage like starchy grains and sugars, plant-based foods will keep you full without piling on the pounds.

 

Fat Loss Diet – The Proven Success of Going Vegetarian

 

Ample evidence abounds about the benefits of adopting a plant-based diet for weight loss. Forza, a sports nutrition company, recently published a study on weight loss that revealed that vegetarians lost weight close to twice as fast as their meat-eating subjects, losing four pounds a month instead of two.

 

In fact, 90% of the study’s participants found it easier to start losing weight once they gave up meat. Other studies back up these findings, including from the University of South Carolina.

 

The key to weight loss success with going meatless is that it quickly becomes a less like a diet, and more of a lifestyle. To make a real change for your health, you need to get rid of the idea of short term “dieting” in favor of long-term lifestyle changes that will last long after you’re happy with the numbers on the scale.

 

What Needs to Happen to Make Vegetarianism Effective

 

Naturally, losing weight while vegetarian isn’t as simple as taking meat off your menu.

 

Plenty of vegetarians is obese today because they snack on the empty calories in sodas and potato chips rather than filling their diet with healthy foods.

 

Filling up on processed carbs will keep your belly fat right in place, so in order to experience long lasting change, you will need to eat adequate amounts of beans, fresh fruits and vegetables, soy protein and even eggs and milk. It’s also important to ensure you stay well nourished by monitoring the levels of nutrients your foods provide for you.

 

It’s all too easy to cause your body to suffer without following a smart vegetarian plan, so make sure to eat your fill of these three nutrients to prevent problems from developing.

 

Protein: While meat is the most celebrated form of protein, plenty of plants are filled with it too. Most experts recommend eating about 10% of your calories as protein, so fill up on beans, lentils, tofu and veggie burgers to ensure you get your fill.

 

Calcium: There’s no reason to despair if you’ve given up dairy. Plant-based sources of calcium include kale, collards, beans, broccoli, orange juice and soy milk.

 

Vitamin B12: Because this crucial vitamin is only found in animal products, consider taking a daily supplement if you aren’t willing to down an occasional glass of milk.

 

Watch this video – Eating for FAT Loss – Vegetarian

In Summary

 

Most conventional diets will fail you in the long term, but a lifestyle change to a vegetarian diet is a great way to get rid of weight that just won’t budge. So long as you eat a healthy, well-balanced vegetarian diet filled with plenty of plants, you’ll be amazed how quickly your unwanted belly fat melts right off.

 

Going vegetarian might be tricky at first, but the benefits to your body make it well worth it in the long run. Yes, the vegetarian diet is the ultimate fat loss diet because it’s based on eating organic*, whole foods that tend to be light on calories and loaded with nutrients.

 

*Eating organic foods aren’t necessarily a part of the traditional definition of what a “vegetarian” diet is, but going organic is certainly the modern trend, and it’s also what we advocate at VB.

 

Author Bio:

 

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

 

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

 

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

 

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

 

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Vegan Fat Loss Diet

 

Protein Foods for Bodybuilding – The Ideal Protein Diet (Q&A)

The Ideal Protein Diet (Q&A) - This isn’t just a bodybuilding and fitness question; this seems to be on the minds of most people these days. This article will address the most common protein questions and answers.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUILD MUSCLE & LOSE FAT BY EATING PLANTS

 

This isn’t just a bodybuilding and fitness question; this seems to be on the minds of most people these days.

 

This article will address the most common protein questions and answers.

 

Looking through the web today, the information available about protein is anything but clear. Which amino acids are you supposed to eat? Can vegetarian and vegan bodybuilders eat enough protein to put on muscle?

 

Striving to answer your protein questions on your own, you’re more likely to come away with a headache than with satisfying answers. But not to worry, your most burning questions about protein needs for vegetarians are addressed here.

 

Q: How much protein does a vegan bodybuilder need?

 

A: Probably less than you think. The majority of meat-loving bodybuilders have adopted a “more is better” mentality when it comes to packing the protein into their diet.

 

The truth is that going over recommended daily protein levels won’t be of much benefit to you and will likely leave you feeling overly full and uncomfortable after meals. Also, something about “vegan macros” keeps you light on your feet.

 

According to research, the optimal protein intake level for professional bodybuilders is between 0.7 to 1 gram of protein per pound of lean muscle. For example, a 200-pound bodybuilder that has 10% body fat should plan to eat between 126 to 180 grams of protein every day.

 

If you’re looking to gain lots of muscle, choose to follow the higher end of this recommendation.

 

Q: What are complete and incomplete proteins?

 

A: All types of amino acids, the building blocks of protein, are separated into two categories: essential and nonessential. Nonessential amino acids are naturally made by your body, while essential amino acids only come from food sources.

 

There are nine essential amino acids (histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine) that your body can’t make for itself, meaning you need to get them from your daily diet.

 

The foods that contain all nine essential amino acids are considered to be complete proteins. They tend to be animal products like meat, eggs and dairy, and a few plant sources like soy, chia seeds, and quinoa. Incomplete proteins are found in plants and are usually lacking one or more of the essential amino acids required for building and repairing cells.

 

However, eating several types of incomplete protein foods within one day can provide your body with all the amino acids it needs to make complete proteins.

 

Q: Is seitan a complete protein?

 

A: Often compared in texture and taste to lean meats, seitan is a form of wheat gluten that is turned into a dense, chewy meat substitute. Almost 20 grams of protein in a 3-ounce serving makes seitan a smart protein pick for your plate, but it’s not a complete protein.

 

Seitan contains every essential amino acid besides lysine, so vegan eaters need to find alternative sources of protein (like cooked lentils or roasted almonds) to get their recommended daily level of 2,045 mg of lysine.

 

Q: Are beans a complete protein?

 

A: While beans vary considerably in their protein profiles between varieties, no variety technically can be considered a complete protein. Thankfully, it’s simple to adjust your diet accordingly.

 

Contrary to popular advice that keeps getting regurgitated, adding a few scoops to your plate of beans won’t do crap to make a complete protein. Rice has virtually negligible amounts of protein in it to have any substantial effect.

 

Instead, try adding Brazil nuts with your beans, they are loaded with protein and have that healthy fat you need for fuel and recovery. This combo should absolutely be a part of your ideal protein diet.

 

Q: Is the protein in yogurt complete?

 

A: Because animal sources of protein are complete proteins, a serving of yogurt will provide you with all the amino acids your body needs to function. Greek yogurt tends to be the most protein-filled variety, with an average of 17 grams per serving to keep you full.

 

Q: Is milk a complete protein?

 

A: Though dairy products are mostly celebrated for its calcium content, milk is an excellent source of complete protein as well. In fact, milk is especially rich in the amino acid lysine, one that tends to be rare in vegetable and whole grain protein sources.

 

One 8-ounce serving of whole milk provides 7.7 grams of protein, while reduced fat milk tends to have slightly more protein, 8 grams and 8.2 grams of 2 percent and 1 percent respectively.

 

Q: Are almonds a complete protein?

 

A: Though almonds are filled with 6 grams of protein per one ounce serving (about 23 almonds), they are critically short on lysine, methionine, and cysteine, making them an incomplete protein source.

 

Nonetheless, snacking on almonds is a smart way for vegans and vegetarians to get their fill of protein throughout the day, so long as they are paired with other protein sources as well.

 

Q: Is quinoa really a complete protein?

 

A: Originally grown in the Andes mountains of Peru, quinoa is a whole grain food that is also a plant-based complete protein. In fact, the overall protein level in quinoa is a strikingly high 8 grams per one cup serving. This is an ideal protein for sure!

 

However, the levels of some amino acids tend to be low, meaning that a quinoa diet should still be supplemented with other sources of protein to ensure you get enough.

 

Q: Are chick peas a complete protein?

 

A: Like all other forms of beans, chick peas lack all the essential amino acids that would qualify them as a complete protein. However, a classic food combination is the perfect way to balance out your chickpea meal. The protein in wheat lacks lysine, which happens to be an amino acid chickpeas have plenty of. This means snacking on pita bread and hummus is a great way to fill your diet with a complete protein source.

 

Q: Is soy a complete or incomplete protein?

 

A: For many vegans, soy-based products are a staple of their diet, and for good reason! Soy is a plant-based source of complete proteins, and a half-cup serving of tofu provides you with 10 grams of complete protein.

 

Some experts say that we should stay away from soy, but I think the main thing to avoid is the GMO soy products.

 

It’s always best to choose the firmest tofu you can find, as it will have the highest protein content. For an even bigger protein boost, fermented forms of tofu like tempeh and natto have a staggering 15 grams per serving.

 

Q: What is an example of a complementary protein?

 

A: According to most nutritionists, complementary proteins are made from two or more incomplete proteins that are eaten together in a meal to provide you with all the essential acids that make up complete proteins.

 

While it’s not necessary to have every amino acid present at each meal you eat, combining your foods into complementary proteins is an easy way to ensure you get the proper amounts throughout the day.

 

Best of all, many complementary proteins provide from time-tested and delicious combinations that truly taste better together. In fact, cultures around the world often intuitively relied on complementary protein combinations for their health benefits.

 

Some winning combinations of complementary proteins include beans and Brazil nuts, whole grain noodles and peanut sauce, hummus and pita bread, and spinach salad topped with nuts.

 

The Ideal Protein Diet

 

It turns out that there is a diet called “Ideal Protein.” I wanted to offer some quick feedback on this overly restrictive diet since our article happens to be titled “Ideal Protein Diet.”

 

One major point of contention is that it’s ridiculous to eliminate nuts, fruit, and root vegetables, for any reason (unless you’re allergic). Women’s Health magazine offered this quote that I agree with even though I don’t personally eat dairy:

 

“It’s sending the wrong message that these healthy foods contribute to weight gain, when studies have shown that foods like dairy and nuts may help support satiety and weight loss.

“One study, published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that people who ate one-third of a cup of almonds a day lost more weight than those who avoided nuts.”

 

Even though I like that the Ideal Protein diet advocates dropping sugar altogether, swearing off several food groups at a time may not be the way to go for a sustainable lifestyle.

 

One final suggestion is to slow down and bring more awareness to the act of eating itself (i.e. mindful eating). Mindful eating has a practical application when it comes to weight maintenance, treating obesity, weight loss, and even diabetes self-management.

 

For more ideas on the ideal protein diet, watch this video – 6 High Protein Recipes For Weight Loss

Author Bio:

 

Chris Willitts (creator of V3), is the founder and owner of Vegetarian Bodybuilding.

 

V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System is a mixture of science and author’s advice, providing users with optimal diet and exercise. This system is designed for vegans and vegetarians only.

 

A lot of research has been put in this program. Furthermore, a lot of professional bodybuilders and athletes tried and tested the program, praising its progressiveness and efficiency.

 

The program is about taking control of your own body and health according to your potential and needs. And worry not; you’ll get plenty of proteins with this system. It will boost you with energy, and you’ll feel just a strong as any carnivore would (perhaps even stronger, depending on how much you invest in your exercise). It avoids vitamins deficiency and provides you with a lot of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. 

 

Instead of saying things like “I think a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders,” the V3 Vegetarian Bodybuilding System claims “I know a plant-based diet is good for athletes and bodybuilders, and I have results to prove it.”

 

To find out more, visit the website at V3 Bodybuilding – Ideal Protein Diet