Which doctors may treat bad breath?

Which doctors may treat bad breath? Even if you are maintaining an effective oral-hygiene routine of brushing your teeth, tongue, and gums and flossing after every meal or snack, you may still be experiencing bad breath. If this is the case, to treat bad breath, you should see a doctor or a dentist.
Click HERE to Discover How You Can Get Yourself Cleaner, Fresher Breath and a MORE Kissable Mouth

For those who suffer from chronic bad breath, also known as halitosis, a home oral-care routine may not be enough to treat bad breath.

 

Even if you are maintaining an effective oral-hygiene routine of brushing your teeth, tongue, and gums and flossing after every meal or snack, you may still be experiencing bad breath. If this is the case, to treat bad breath, you should see a doctor or a dentist.

According to the Academy of General Dentistry, over 90% of bad breath cases are linked to issues in the mouth, throat, and tonsils. As a result, seeing a dentist is often the wisest option to treat bad breath.

 

To treat bad breath, your dentist can perform regular cleanings and exams, and he or she can also conduct further tests to ascertain what parts of your mouth are contributing to bad breath. Generally, your dentist is able to treat the causes of your bad breath.

 

If he or she determines that your mouth is healthy and not responsible for bad breath, your dentist may refer you to your family doctor or to a specialist for treatment.

Alternatively, another illness such as diabetes, cancer, or a respiratory infection can lead to symptoms involving bad breath. For cases like these, you should see your primary healthcare provider to diagnose and treat these underlying causes of unpleasant oral odor.

 

Sometimes medications are to blame for causing bad breath. If you suspect this may be the case, ask your prescribing physician if the medication can be adjusted or if he or she can suggest other options to treat bad breath.

Bad breath in infants or young children may indicate an infection or an undiagnosed medical issue. In these cases, consult your child’s pediatrician or dentist as soon as possible.

 

For adults and children, taking proper care of your teeth and visiting the dentist at least twice a year are the simplest ways to avoid bad breath and other oral-health concerns.

 

Watch this Video – The Doctors: Dr. Bill Dorfman on How to Cure Bad Breath

This article is based on the book,” Bad Breath Free Forever” by James Williams. This special report contains vital information that will enable you to take control of your life, banish bad breath, save your sex life, career and personal relationships.

 

Never again will you suffer the humiliation of bad breath. Get yourself cleaner, fresher breath and a more kissable mouth. You will enjoy increased self-confidence and positive effects on your self-esteem.

 

To find out how you can do it, CLICK HERE

 

Halitosis (bad breath) can be solved with good oral hygiene

Halitosis (bad breath) can be solved with good oral hygiene - Chronic bad breath, also known as halitosis, can be an embarrassing sign of poor oral hygiene. Certain foods, medical conditions, and personal-hygiene habits can all cause bad breath. Most of the time, you can combat bad breath by developing and adhering to a proper oral hygiene routine.
Click HERE to Discover How You Can Get Yourself Cleaner, Fresher Breath and a MORE Kissable Mouth

 

Chronic bad breath, also known as halitosis, can be an embarrassing sign of poor oral hygiene. Certain foods, medical conditions, and personal-hygiene habits can all cause bad breath. Most of the time, you can combat bad breath by developing and adhering to a proper oral hygiene routine.

If you suffer from bad breath, it’s important to review your oral hygiene habits. Although brushing is important, good oral health involves more than simply brushing your teeth each day.

 

To promote healthy oral hygiene, brush your teeth, tongue, and gums with a fluoride toothpaste and floss at least twice a day, preferably after every meal and snack.

 

Brushing and flossing removes plaque from the mouth to limit decay and odor, as residual plaque leads to tooth decay, gum disease, and other periodontal conditions.

 

In addition to brushing and flossing, using an antimicrobial or fluoride-based mouth rinse can help combat odor and promote better oral health.

Without an effective oral hygiene routine, foods and drinks with high amounts of sugar can become lodged in your teeth and cause bad breath.

 

The chemical breakdown of certain foods such as onions, garlic, and strong spices can cause short-term odor in the mouth. Avoiding these pungent foods can often improve bad breath symptoms.

 

Long-term odor, however, is often the result of residual food particles, which form a colorless, sticky film of sulfur-producing bacteria on your teeth. Your tongue can also trap bacteria on its uneven surface and contribute to odor production.

 

Additionally, when dental fixtures like retainers or dentures are not cleaned regularly, they can harbor odor-causing food particles and bacteria. Cleaning all dental fixtures daily is an essential part of combating bad breath.

To prevent or treat bad breath and other symptoms of poor oral health, be sure to schedule regular dental cleanings and exams with your oral healthcare provider.

 

Contact your dentist if you begin to notice persistent bad breath, as he or she can help you develop a personalized oral-health plan to combat odor and ensure an effective oral hygiene routine.

 

Watch this Video – Do You Suffer From BAD BREATH (HALITOSIS)? – HOME REMEDIES for Bad Breath – PowerHealthYT

This article is based on the book,” Bad Breath Free Forever” by James Williams. This special report contains vital information that will enable you to take control of your life, banish bad breath, save your sex life, career and personal relationships.

 

Never again will you suffer the humiliation of bad breath. Get yourself cleaner, fresher breath and a more kissable mouth. You will enjoy increased self-confidence and positive effects on your self-esteem.

 

To find out how you can do it, CLICK HERE

 

Gum disease is a common cause of bad breath

Gum Disease Is a Common Cause of Bad Breath - Gum disease occurs just below the gum line by causing the inflammation and breakdown of the tooth's attachment site and its supporting tissues. Although gum disease is a chief cause of bad breath, it is generally treatable by an oral-healthcare professional.
Click HERE to Discover How You Can Get Yourself Cleaner, Fresher Breath and a MORE Kissable Mouth

Bad breath is often caused by gum disease, also known as periodontal disease. In gum disease, the tissues that surround the teeth become infected.

 

Gum disease occurs just below the gum line by causing the inflammation and breakdown of the tooth’s attachment site and its supporting tissues. Although gum disease is a chief cause of bad breath, it is generally treatable by an oral-healthcare professional.

There are two forms of gum disease. Gingivitis is a form of gum disease that affects only the gums, the soft tissue surrounding your teeth. Periodontitis is the more severe form of gum disease. In periodontitis, infection spreads to below the gums to damage other types of surrounding tissue and the bones that support the teeth.

Gum disease is often the result of plaque build-up in the mouth. The plaque build-up that causes gum disease and the accompanying bad breath is generally due to poor oral hygiene, smoking, impaired immune function, and medical conditions such as diabetes.

 

Bacteria cause the formation of oral toxins, which irritate the gums. If gum disease continues to progress without treatment, you can experience substantial damage to your jawbone and gums.

As bacterial plaque begins to accumulate in the mouth, the bacteria reacts with residual sugary particles to make toxins and other chemicals. These toxins cause great irritation to the gums, prompting them to become inflamed and bleed easily upon contact.

 

Over time, plaque hardens into a solid build-up called calculus or tartar, which further irritates the gums and causes them to pull away from your teeth. Bad breath, pain, and discomfort can result from progressive gum disease.

If you are beginning to experience the signs of gum disease, see your dentist. Milder forms of gum disease can be controlled by regular professional cleanings and consistent hygiene at home.

 

For more severe forms of gum disease, your dentist or hygienist may recommend scaling or root planing. Scaling involves the removal of hard and soft calculus deposits from the tooth crown, while root planing removes deposits that have collected along root surfaces beneath the gums. These procedures clear deposits to reduce the inflammation, pain, and odor associated with gum disease.

 

Watch this Video – 7 Effective Home Remedies For Gum Disease (Periodontal Disease) That You Should know

This article is based on the book,” Bad Breath Free Forever” by James Williams. This special report contains vital information that will enable you to take control of your life, banish bad breath, save your sex life, career and personal relationships.

 

Never again will you suffer the humiliation of bad breath. Get yourself cleaner, fresher breath and a more kissable mouth. You will enjoy increased self-confidence and positive effects on your self-esteem.

 

To find out how you can do it, CLICK HERE

16 Ways to Prevent and Get Rid of Cold Sores

16 Ways to Prevent and Get Rid of Cold Sores  -  A cold sore is not welcome on your face, or anywhere else, for that matter. Not only are they cosmetically unappealing, they can be downright painful. Here are 16 ways to prevent and get rid of cold sores
Click HERE to Discover the 215+ Home Remedies, Natural Beauty Recipes & DIY Household Products

 

A cold sore is not welcome on your face, or anywhere else, for that matter. Not only are they cosmetically unappealing, they can be downright painful. Let’s get over the fact they’re caused by the herpes virus. We all know it, and that aspect gets far too much attention.

 

Defining cold sores simply for what they are, they are small, fluid filled lesions that pop up generally on or around your lips. The blisters often group together, and after they break, a crust forms over the resulting sore.

 

There is no true cure for the virus, or the cold sores. The bright side is that there are preventative measures you can take that lessen outbreaks, severity, and duration.

 

If the bothersome blisters do show up, there are a decent number of home remedies for cold sores that may ease your discomfort, and help diminish their appearance.

 

Just because there is no cure, doesn’t mean you’re stuck using irritating prescription face creams or having a cold sore that hangs around for an eternity.

 

Below are 16 ways to prevent and get rid of cold sores

 

  1. Enjoy vanilla

 

Vanilla extract, the real, good, pure, vanilla extract, is a natural cold sore remedy some people swear by. The thought process is that its alcohol based, and running along those lines, makes it hard for the virus to thrive and either wipes it out or lessens the severity and length of the outbreak.

 

If you want to use vanilla to prevent and get rid of cold sores, try and get it organic, and try to start using it the second you feel the tingling set it.

 

You will need…
-a cotton swab or cotton pad
-pure vanilla extract

 

Directions…
Soak cotton pad or swab in vanilla until thoroughly saturated. Apply directly to sore, holding the swab or pad in place for a minute or so. Do this four times daily until no longer needed.

 

  1. Snag some licorice

 

One of the more random natural remedies for cold sores that you can use is licorice. Glycyrhizic acid, an ingredient in licorice root, has been shown in some studies to stop the virus cells in their nasty little tracks-or at least counteract the symptoms of them. This is thanks to its anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties.

 

A way to glean something positive from this isn’t to go munch on a bunch of licorice whips, but rather get some licorice powder, and make a cream.

 

To prevent and treat cold sores, you can also try drinking licorice tea daily, though that doesn’t seem as effective as topical treatment.

 

You will need…
-1 tablespoon licorice root powder or extract
-1/2 teaspoon fresh water OR approximately 2 teaspoons petroleum jelly

 

Directions…
Mix one tablespoon of licorice root powder to ½ teaspoon of fresh water, or however much you need to get the consistency of cream you want, making sure to add in small increments.

 

Another option to prevent and treat cold sores is to mix it with petroleum jelly, which on its own can help speed up the healing process of cold sores.

 

If you opt for this, start with a teaspoon of the petroleum jelly and mix it with the licorice root. You can work your way up to your desired consistency from there.

 

Gently dab (a cotton swab is handy for this) a thin layer over the sore, making sure to get it completely covered. Leave it on for at least several hours, or overnight if possible.

 

  1. Toss your toothbrush

 

Throw out your toothbrush after the blister has formed, and toss it once the sore has cleared up. A toothbrush is the perfect vessel to carry the virus, and you can end up triggering an outbreak in yourself if you re-use the same toothbrush again and again.

 

This is a preventative measure, since it can stop an outbreak or cut it short, it’s well worth doing.

 

  1. Hands off

 

It may sound obvious, but it can be near an impossible to resist picking at that crusty little (or big) patch by your mouth. Almost subconsciously you can end up bothering it, or very consciously, you just want to peel it off and be done with it.

 

Whatever your motive, resist touching the sore-even just reaching up to touch it and see if it somehow shrunk-as those actions can cause a bacterial infection. That’s the last thing you need.

 

They are also so highly contagious that even touching your sore and then accidentally rubbing your eye, or somewhere else on your body, could cause them to spread (they aren’t confined just to the mouth, you know.)

 

  1. Get milk

 

Putting a whole milk compress on your sore can help speed up the healing, and ease pain. The reason? Milk contains proteins known as immunoglobulins, which are essentially anti-bodies that fight off and prevent viruses-like herpes.

 

Milk also contains l-lysine. L-lysine helps inhibit the wicked work of an ammino acid called arginine, which has been shown to cause outbreaks, and may help speed up the healing process as well.

 

In short to prevent outbreaks, drink whole milk and get your dose of l-lysine. To help cold sores that have already erupted, make a whole milk compress to soothe the pain and fight off the virus.

 

You will need…
-1/2 cup to 1 cup of whole milk, plus a tablespoon or 2 extra
-cotton balls or cotton pads

 

Directions
Soak a cotton ball in approximately 1 tablespoon of milk, and apply it directly to the cold sore for several minutes. Before doing this you can either let the milk come to room temperature or, if you prefer, you can apply it cold.

 

Use a clean towel moistened with water to dab off the milky residue at the end. If you feel you need it, apply a dab of petroleum jelly.

 

  1. Wipe it out with hydrogen peroxide

 

Anyone who had a parent that put hydrogen peroxide on a scrape knows that it’s not exactly pleasant. The good news is that it’s a lot less traumatic to use at your own will, nor does it seem to hurt as bad now that you’ve grown up a bit. Love it or hate it, the solution can be an effective cold sore remedy.

 

Hydrogen peroxide disinfects, healing up speeding, and makes it hard for the surfaced sore to spread or worsen. The blister is already bothered and infected, at the very least virally, and keeping it clean can ultimately make it go away faster.

 

You will need…
-1 tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide
-cotton balls, cotton pads, or facial tissue

 

Directions
Soak a cotton ball in 1 tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide. Use more if you feel it isn’t saturated enough.

 

Place the cotton ball directly on your sore- it’s probably going to sting-and hold it there for a few seconds, or dab it around. Let it be for 5 minutes or so, allowing it to do its job, before rinsing off.

 

  1. Be minty fresh

 

Peppermint oil is thought to have properties that directly kill virus particles outside of your cells, like the ones floating around an erupted cold sore which makes it a great option to prevent and get rid of cold sores.

 

It won’t help to ingest peppermint oil because it only attacks the virus escaped from your cells.

 

What we mean by it being “outside” of your cells is that herpes simplex virus usually resides beneath the skin, lurking and waiting for a trigger to make it rear its ugly head. When its’ erupted, it is accessible to treat with the oil.

 

When applied directly to a cold sore, people have found that the sore healed faster than usual-especially when applied at the very first sign of one.

 

You will need…
-Good quality peppermint oil
-1 cotton swab
-a bit of fresh water

 

Directions
First, use a bit of water to rinse the surface of the cold sore. Doing so gets away some of the surface gunk that would make it harder for the oil to really sink in and do its best.

 

Then, dip a cotton swab in clean water and then dip it into the peppermint oil. This is to dilute it a bit, making it less likely to irritate your skin. Try this twice daily until it is no longer needed.

 

  1. Take Echinacea

 

There are a couple of people I am quite close to who drink Echinacea tea religiously and swear by it. Every time I come down with a bug they give me the “I am not sick now am I?” look, with a meaningful nod at their mug of tea.

 

The reason they get away with their smugness is because Echinacea bolsters your immune system and its defenses, making it harder to catch bugs, and shortening how long you are affected by them.

 

While not yet proven it may help prevent cold sore outbreaks which often show when the immune system is weakened.

 

You will need…
-1 bag of Echinacea tea
-1 cup freshly boiled water

 

Directions
Place your bag in a mug and pour boiling water over it. Cover-a plate works well-and let it steep for 10 minutes. Squeeze the juice out of the bag when you remove it to get all the extra good stuff.

 

  1. Load up on vitamins E and C

 

Vitamins are good for us, and for our cold sores-and by good for our cold sores, I really mean bad for them. Vitamin C has been shown to boost white blood cell count, and white blood cells are the body’s defenders.

 

When something like an infection sets in the brave little cells head into battle, and having more of them means you’ll be more effective at fighting off the infection, which in this case is herpes.

 

Vitamin E, when applied topically, has been found to relieve the irritating and painful discomfort of cold sores, as well as minimize scarring.

 

You can get the vitamins through an oral supplement, oil (in the case of vitamin E) and-the best way-through your diet.

 

Vitamin C rich foods include
-red berries
-kiwi
-broccoli
-tomatoes
-red and green bell peppers
-spinach (little did Popeye know he was onto a cure for cold sores)

 

Vitamin E rich foods include
-nuts
-leafy green vegetables
-whole grain
-avocados

 

  1. Corn starch paste

 

If you’ve worked with corn starch before in your attempt to prevent and get rid of cold sores, you’ll be familiar with its fine, almost silky, texture-it seems like it could be soothing to a cold sore, doesn’t it?

 

I would say so, and it can indeed help relieve the itchy burning pain of a sore when directly applied.

 

The less obvious reason as to why corn starch makes a pleasant home remedy for cold sores is the fact that it neutralizes the pH of the sore- the virus thrives in an overly-acidic environment-and creates an alkaline state (alkaline is the opposite of acidic.)

 

To seek relief, and shorten the duration of your cold sore, simply whip up a silky-smooth corn starch paste.

 

You will need…
-1 tablespoon of corn starch
-1 teaspoon of fresh water to start

 

Measure out 1 tablespoon of corn starch and place in a small bowl. Mix in 1 teaspoon of fresh water. Add more water slowly until you achieve a paste-like consistency.

 

Put a dab on your cold sore before bed, and rinse off gently with water in the morning. Do this nightly until cold sore is gone.

 

  1. Dab on some witch hazel

 

The leaves and bark of North American witch hazel have been used medicinally for years, namely by Native Americans, and have now become quite commercialized.

 

Nowadays you don’t have to worry about tracking down a plant and stripping off its leaves and bark since you can find a bottle of witch hazel, or witch hazel hydrosol, at just about any pharmacy or general store.

 

Since it does not produce enough oil to sell as an essential oil, the hydrosol is a distilled liquid version. It has been shown to help with a number of maladies, particularly in skin care, with emphasis on acne, bruises, insect bites, blisters and, if you hadn’t guessed by now, cold sores.

 

You will need…
-1 teaspoon of witch hazel
-cotton swab or cotton pad

 

Soak a cotton pad or the end of a cotton swab in witch hazel. Dab directly onto your sore, and leave on. Do this 1-2 times daily as needed.

 

  1. Grab some aloe gel

 

The go-to for soothing minor skin irritations, aloe vera gel can provide quick relief from the pain of a cold sore once it blisters. It also fights off bacteria that may be irritating the sore more, and may make it go away faster.

 

Being so dependable, aloe is often touted as being one of the best natural remedies for skin problems there is. The best way to benefit from it is to have an aloe plant.

 

They’re not hard to come by, they’re hardy (I got one when I was five and it managed to survive my care for years,) and best of all, they’re useful and inexpensive. If you cannot get an aloe plant, find a good gel sold in stores.

 

You will need…
-1 aloe plant OR ½ teaspoon of aloe vera gel

 

Directions…
Break off the end of one fleshy, succulent, leaf. Directly apply the gel to your sore. If you absolutely cannot come by a plant, dab a cotton swab in roughly ½ teaspoon aloe vera gel and apply directly. Leave on.

 

  1. Ice it

 

Looks aside, cold sores hurt. They can really, really hurt. Think about what they are-little fluid filled boo-boos that burst, blister, and form a crust. Kind of like constipation, they aren’t taken very seriously.

 

If you complain about constipation pain-which can land you in the E.R., by the way-all people think is “poop” and then they tune out. With cold sores, most people think “herpes” and then move on-especially since cold sores are so common.

 

To numb the pain that some people just don’t understand (and the injustice of it all) try holding an ice cube directly on the sore for as long as possible, and then put on a dab of petroleum jelly.

 

The jelly will help keep bacteria out, and will lessen that tight, skin-splitting sensation that sometimes happens when a blister gets too dry, as it might after using an ice cube. It’s along the same lines of how licking chapped lips makes them worse.

 

You will need…
-1 to 2 fresh ice cubes, or an ice pack
-A bit of petroleum jelly

 

Directions…
Take a nice chilly ice cube, which would be most of them, and hold it on your sore for as long as possible, or use an ice pack. When you’ve finished, pat any obviously remaining water gently from the sore and apply a dab of petroleum jelly.

 

  1. Wear sunscreen-even on your lips

 

Exposure to light, namely UV light, seems to be a very contributing factor in outbreaks. When you hit the beach, or even just go for a summer time stroll, apply sunscreen to your face, and apply lip balm with an SPF value of no less than 15.

 

Indeed it may take you longer to get a crazy tan, but it’s a very, very, small sacrifice to make when you think of the painful cold sores erupting, and damage to your skin.

 

  1. Wash it all away

 

You don’t have to go dump every single thing you own when you get a cold sore, but like your toothbrush, its best to get rid of some things that come in contact with your lips/mouth area-such as lip balm, or make up tools.

 

In addition to this, wash your hands each and every time you touch, or even think you touch, your cold sore. While you’re always contagious, it’s easiest spread the virus when there’s an open blister and you may keep causes outbreaks if you continue using contaminated items.

 

  1. Quarantine right away

 

The moment you feel the tingling sensation that precedes a cold sore flare up, start your treatment. Since there is no “cure” sometimes preventative measures work best, and nipping it in the bud seems to help boost the effectiveness of the treatment afterwards well as shorten the sores existence.

 

When it all comes down to it at the end of the day, you have a virus that will never go away completely until a true cure is found for herpes simplex. That being said, your world does not have to come to a crashing halt when a sore pops up.

 

Use common sense, try to get to it in the beginning, and patiently treat it, keeping in mind that the remedy that works best for you will probably take some trial and error.

 

Since you’ll probably be living together for a while, it’s good to remember that the less you bother your cold sore (i.e. picking at it or using unnecessarily harsh chemicals) the less it will bother you.

 

You can also watch this Video HERE to learn about other ways to prevent and get rid of cold sores.

 

Wet…or dry? A word on cold sore living conditions

 

There are generally two chains of thought when it comes to treating cold sores. One is to dry them out, while the other is to keep them moist. Some people say the virus festers in a moist environment, others say it makes no difference and you’ll be uncomfortable with a dry, cracked, split, scab.

 

There isn’t much official research done on this, but from personal experience, I’d have to toss in with the “wet” lot. Putting a dab of petroleum jelly on a sore is a life-saver. The pain of a dry scab ripping open again and again is too much for me-not to mention I WILL pick at it if it’s all crusty.

 

Perhaps with a bit more clout is the Mayo Clinic which, according to their website, also endorses the moist route for treating cold sores.

 

By Claire Goodall (a bee-obsessed natural-convert from Minnesota) who is a holistic health lover. She is the author of Everyday Roots Book.

 

It’s a Book that she creates to help you replace the toxic products and medications in your home with healthier, all-natural alternatives.

 

It contains 215+ effective home remedies and covers everything you will need to protect your family and save money every month.

 

For more details about her book, take a look at the Everyday Roots Book.

15 Natural Remedies for Heartburn & Severe Acid Reflux

15 Natural Remedies for Heartburn & Severe Acid Reflux   -    While over-the-counter and prescription medications are available, if you suffer only from occasional heartburn, lifestyle changes and using these 15 home remedies for heartburn may be the route you want to take.
Click HERE to Discover the 215+ Home Remedies, Natural Beauty Recipes & DIY Household Products

 

Heartburn is something that most adults will experience during their lifetime. It is characterized by an uncomfortable burning sensation right behind the breastbone that often times creeps up the throat, and is a symptom more so than a disease.

 

It is caused by acid reflux, which occurs when the ring of muscle that allows food into your stomach (the lower esophageal sphincter, or LES) relaxes when it shouldn’t. The result is acid from your stomach goes back up your esophagus, which then causes the sensation of heartburn.

 

Think about it…its acid burning your throat…ouch! It’s actually possible to have reflux without heartburn, but it is not possible to have heartburn without reflux.

 

15 Natural Remedies for Heartburn

 

While over-the-counter and prescription medications are available, if you suffer only from occasional heartburn, lifestyle changes and using these home remedies for heartburn may be the route you want to take.

 

  1. A spoonful of baking soda…

 

A spoonful of sodium bicarbonate, or teaspoon-full to be exact, can help put an end to the gnawing, burning, sensation of heartburn caused by acid reflux.

 

Baking soda, as sodium bicarbonate is more commonly known, can help your reflux and in turn help your heartburn because it is a base substance.

 

It has a pH higher than 7.0, and therefore neutralizes stomach acid. Neutralizing the stomach acid means that if/when your LES decides to be lazy and acid comes up your throat, you don’t get “burned.”

 

You will need…
-1/2 teaspoon or 1 teaspoon of baking soda
-a glass of fresh water

 

Directions
Mix either a ½ teaspoon or 1 single teaspoon of baking soda into a glass of water that is no more than 8 ounces. Give it a good stir and drink all of the mixture.

 

You can repeat this as needed but should not exceed seven ½ teaspoon doses in a 24 hour period. Also, avoid using this as a remedy for more than a week straight, as it is high in salt and can have side effects such as swelling or nausea.

 

  1. Soothe your stomach with aloe juice

 

Aloe is a plant used to soothe burns, and people often think of using it to help something like sunburn, but it can do more than that. It may be able to help with heartburn too because it reduces inflammation.

 

This means when your tummy starts getting irritated and inflamed, or your esophagus is getting eaten away at, a nice glass of aloe vera juice may be just the thing to help calm it down.

 

You will need…
-1/2 cup aloe vera juice

 

Directions
Drink a ½ cup of aloe juice, cool or room temperature, before meals. Keep in mind that aloe can act as a laxative, so unless you’re looking to fit in a few extra bathroom Sudoku puzzles, look for a brand that has the laxative component removed.

 

  1. Chew gum

 

The Journal of Dental Research conducted a study that showed people with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or chronic heartburn, experienced relief when they chewed a piece of sugar-free gum for 30 minutes after a meal.

 

This is because chewing gum stimulates the salivary glands, and increases the flow of saliva. Any acid that has built up in the gut is diluted and washed away or cleared out more quickly. The clearance of acid then improves the symptoms of GERD.

 

It is possible that the same school of thought could be applied to occasional heartburn as well. It’s our regular saliva that we swallow that actually makes normal bouts of reflux here and there completely painless.

 

You will need…
-1 piece of sugar-free gum

 

Directions…
After a meal, pop in a piece of sugar-free gum and chew for 30 minutes to help ward off heartburn.

 

  1. Chin up (and don’t lie down)

 

Heartburn tends to get worse at night, thanks to the fact that you’re lying down when you sleep. Gravity works against you, and it’s easier for the digested contents of your stomach to back up into your esophagus, along with acid.

 

Try elevating your head about 6 inches when you sleep by placing bricks, books, or blocks under the legs at the head of your bed. You could also try a wedge-shaped pillow under your mattress, but don’t simply pile up extra pillows as it’s easy to slip off of them at night.

 

Don’t lie down within 3-4 hours after eating, because lying down with a full stomach makes stomach contents press harder against your lower esophageal sphincter.

 

  1. How, what, and when

 

Watch how you eat: Don’t inhale giant mouthfuls of food. Take smaller bites and eat slowly, allowing your stomach time to digest and without giving it an excuse to pump out excess acid.

 

Watch what you eat: You’re probably aware that specific foods trigger heartburn, usually foods high in acid (tomatoes or citrus fruits, for example,) or spicy foods. Avoid these as best you can to ward off

 

Watch when you eat: Don’t eat within 3-4 hours before bed. Lying down puts more pressure on your LES and increases the likelihood of acid sneaking through.

 

  1. Get more acid

 

When you have acid burning your esophagus, it seems quite counterintuitive to ingest even more acid.

 

In many cases though, acid reflux is caused by having not enough acid in your stomach, rather than having too much, as over-the-counter or prescription “acid blockers” imply (although that can also be the case, among other factors.)

 

It is the acid itself that tells the lower esophageal sphincter to tighten and close off. If you don’t produce enough acid, your LES is going to think it’s no big deal to loosen up for a little bit. Then of course, you get a reflux of acid into your esophagus.

 

If you think this may be your case, try drinking some pure, raw, unfiltered apple cider vinegar to see if this prevents your reflux, or cuts it off.

 

You will need…
-3 teaspoons or 1 tablespoon of raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar
-6 to 8 ounces of fresh water

 

Directions
Mix 3 teaspoons, or up to 1 tablespoon, of apple cider vinegar into 6-8 ounces of fresh water, and drink.

 

You can do this before each meal (probably the most effective,) before bedtime, or 2-3 times during the day. If you feel is worsens your reflux, do not continue to ingest it. Too much may also contribute to the problem.

 

  1. Eat a banana or an apple

 

Bananas contain natural antacids that can act as a buffer against acid reflux. If you want to try out the simplest home remedies for heartburn first, try letting a few bananas ripen up nicely and eating one every day.

 

Another option is to try an apple a day. Slice one up and eat it a couple of hours before bedtime to relieve or prevent discomfort.

 

  1. Make gingerroot tea

 

Gingerroot can help ease up a number of stomach woes, from nausea to acid reflux. Sipping a cup of fresh tea about 20 minutes before a meal can help calm down your tummy and act as an acid buffer.

 

You will need…
-3 quarter sized slices of gingerroot
-2 cups of water

 

Slice up 3 quarter sized pieces of gingerroot and simmer gently in 2 cups of water, covered, for 30 minutes. Remove the ginger pieces, or leave them in, pour into a glass, and drink all of it about 20 minutes before a meal.

 

  1. Track your triggers

 

It takes time, energy, and dedication, but tracking what triggers your heartburn may be what ultimately makes it go away in the end.

 

Instead of going crazy with what you eat and relying on over-the-counter medications to keep the acid at bay, keep a little diary of sorts that makes note of what you ate, and if/when it caused heartburn.

 

Also keep track of activities and what you’re wearing (explained in #10.)

 

  1. Avoid tight fitting clothes

 

Things cinched tightly about your waist or middle can worsen heartburn. If you have super tight jeans on, when you sit down, the waistband is going to sink into your abdomen region. Same goes for tight belts-and even shirts can be a problem for some.

 

This is because all of the above puts extra pressure on your lower esophageal sphincter, which make it more likely stomach contents, will push through and you’ll experience reflux.

 

  1. Smoking + alcohol = heart on fire

 

Smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol can set you up for terrible reflux. The nicotine and alcohol both work to weaken your LES, making it that much easier for stomach contents and acid to splash up into your esophagus. Alcohol is also going to irritate your stomach in general.

 

The solution? Quit smoking, and drink less (if at all.) Doing both will improve your health overall, in addition to relieving acid reflux.

 

  1. Maintain a healthy weight

 

Being overweight increases your risk of GERD, and you’re going to suffer from occasional heartburn a lot more as well.

 

This is because unnecessarily added pounds will put pressure on your lower esophageal sphincter. It will be more likely to loosen, and overtime it may simply weaken.

 

  1. Mustard.

 

Mustard is an alkalizing food that is full of minerals, and contains a weak acid in the form of vinegar. Consuming mustard straight, while it may make you grimace at first, may ultimately end up making your smile.

 

Because of its alkaline properties, it will help neutralize the acid that may come creeping up your throat, and therefore may neutralize the pain of acid reflux. It seems to be the most helpful if you’re feeling a bout of heartburn creeping up, or if you’re in the midst of one.

 

You will need…
-1 teaspoon of good quality yellow mustard

 

Directions
Muster up some courage, and just take that little sucker straight.

 

  1. Snack on almonds

 

A natural remedy for heartburn from Reader’s Digest, eat some almonds after every meal, every snack, every time you ingest something basically. Try to track down organic almonds if possible.

 

These tasty nuts do something to seemingly neutralize the juices in your stomach, relieving and preventing some instances of heartburn.

 

You will need…
-3 to 4 almonds

 

Directions…
Directly after every meal, every snack, basically every time you ingest something, eat 3-4 almonds afterwards. There’s no need to eat more, unless of course you want to munch on some more.

 

But keep in mind that in excess some people have found almonds trigger heartburn, kind of like how they help tension headaches but can trigger migraines.

 

  1. A cup of chamomile

 

Having a spot of chamomile tea about ½ – 1 hour before you plan on going to sleep can help reduce inflammation in your stomach, and possibly balance out the acidity levels as well.

 

Chamomile tea also does wonders for relieving stress, which can trigger acid reflux, and will help you sleep through the night as well. You can use instant chamomile tea, or you can easily make your own fresh.

 

You will need…
-1 teaspoon dried chamomile flower petals
-Strainer
-1 cup of boiling water
-Honey or lemon (optional)

 

Directions
Boil one cup of water in a cooking pot, and then reduce the heat. Stir in 1 teaspoon of dried chamomile petals, and let them simmer for 45 seconds.

 

Remove from heat and let the petals soak for another minute or two before straining them. Pour the tea into a mug, and add a bit of honey or lemon if you wish.

 

When I was very young, around 5 or 6, I remember hearing my babysitter talk about heartburn, and I was horrified. I asked her if it meant your heart was on fire and she said “yes.”

 

I paused and then said “like, there are actually flames around your heart?” My babysitter nodded solemnly.

 

Now, of course, I know better than that, but it’s still called heartburn for a reason. The searing, burning, pain does indeed feel like someone lit a fire in your chest, and let the flames spread to your throat.

 

Certain medications may quell the discomfort, but they can have long-term side effects, create dependency, are hard on your system, and often times aren’t even necessary for occasional acid reflux.

 

It may be awhile of trial and error when using these natural remedies for heartburn to find what works best, but in the long run, it’s well worth it.

 

To learn about other natural remedies for heartburn, watch this Video HERE.

 

By Claire Goodall (a bee-obsessed natural-convert from Minnesota) who is a holistic health lover. She is the author of Everyday Roots Book.

 

It’s a Book that she creates to help you replace the toxic products and medications in your home with healthier, all-natural alternatives.

 

It contains 215+ effective home remedies and covers everything you will need to protect your family and save money every month.

 

For more details about her book, take a look at the Everyday Roots Book.