Small Dietary Change Are More Effective Than Blood Pressure Medications

Small Dietary Change Are More Effective Than Blood Pressure Medications -  Most doctors immediately reach for blood pressure medications to prescribe to people with high blood pressure. But a new study by Johns Hopkins School of Medicine researchers now shows that they are wrong to do so, as simple dietary changes are much more effective than blood pressure medications —without the side effects.
Click HERE to Learn How to Control Your High Blood Pressure Naturally Without Expensive Medication

 

Most doctors immediately reach for blood pressure medications to prescribe to people with high blood pressure.

 

But a new study by Johns Hopkins School of Medicine researchers now shows that they are wrong to do so, as simple dietary changes are much more effective than blood pressure medications —without the side effects.

 

The two most common diets recommended for high blood pressure are a low-salt diet and the US National Institutes of Health’s DASH diet.

 

This research team decided to find out what would happen if people followed both these at the same time.

 

They gathered 412 adults with high blood pressure. None of the participants were taking blood pressure medications.

 

They put all of them on the DASH diet for 12 weeks and, during this same period, they randomly put each participant on low, medium, and high sodium diets for four weeks at a time.

 

The participants experienced an average of 4 – 11 mm Hg reduction in systolic blood pressure when on the DASH diet alone. The higher their original blood pressure was, the more their blood pressure went down.

 

But when they added the low-salt diet to the DASH diet, they hit the jackpot:

 

1.  Those with a systolic score between 120 and 129 dropped 5 mm Hg.
2. Those with a score between 130 and 139 dropped 7 mm Hg.
3. Those with a score between 140 and 149 dropped 10 mm Hg.
4. Those with a score from 150 upwards dropped 21 mm Hg.

 

This is genuinely spectacular for two reasons:

 

Firstly, it works best for those who need it the most, namely, those with the highest blood pressure.

 

Secondly, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors, the two most commonly prescribed blood pressure medications, lower blood pressure by only 10 to 15 mm Hg.

 

This means that dieting is more effective than the blood pressure medications doctors prescribe, especially if your blood pressure is above 150 mm Hg.

The participants did have their meals prepared strictly according to the two diets, so to achieve these results, you will have to be precise.

 

The DASH diet is basically an Americanized version of the Mediterranean diet. It is rich in vegetables and fruits, and it encourages the intake of legumes, nuts, seeds, low-fat dairy, lean meat, fish, poultry and whole grains.

 

It does not permit refined grains, animal fats, hydrogenated oils, or sugary treats or drinks.

 

The US Food and Drug Administration recommends a maximum of 2,300 mg of salt per day, but this qualified as medium-salt intake in the study. To meet requirements for the low-salt diet, you should eat no more than 1,150 mg of daily salt.

 

This means eating almost no processed foods like deli meats, chips, sauces, marinades, soups, sandwich spreads, and so forth.

 

Now, if this sounds like too big of a dietary adjustment for you, then there is another option that doesn’t require dietary changes.

 

The 3 easy exercises found here cause almost everyone’s blood pressure to drop below 120/80 – sometimes the very first day…

 

Watch this Video – Stop Hypertension with the DASH diet

This post is from the High Blood Pressure Exercise Program. It was created by Christian Goodman Blue Heron health news that has been recognized as one of the top quality national health information websites. 

 

This program will provide you the natural high blood pressure treatments, natural recipes to cook healthy meals and useful strategies to build a healthy diet with the aim to help you to maintain and stabilize your blood pressure.

 

To find out more about this program, click on How to Lower High Blood Pressure Risk Naturally

Do blood pressure medications increase breast cancer risk?

Do blood pressure medications increase breast cancer risk? There has been some evidence suggesting that some blood pressure medications may be related to breast cancer risk. The study of nearly 3,000 women found that among high blood pressure drugs, only calcium channel blockers carry the heightened breast cancer risk.
Click HERE to Learn How to Control Your High Blood Pressure Naturally Without Expensive Medication

 

Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in women. The chance that you might develop cancer depends on both genetic and non-genetic factors. The latter may include diet, exercise, or exposure to other substances, including medications.

 

Hypertension is a chronic condition that is often treated with medications known as antihypertensive agents.

 

Several different types of antihypertensive agents include angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs), beta blockers, diuretics and calcium-channel blockers.

 

Calcium channel blockers reduce blood pressure by limiting calcium entry into the muscle cells in the artery wall, thereby limiting muscle contraction.

 

Channel blockers include amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Cardizem LA, Tiazac), isradipine (DynaCirc CR), nicardipine (Cardene SR), nifedipine (Procardia, Procardia XL, Adalat CC), nisoldipine (Sular), and verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Covera-PM).

 

Can blood pressure medications linked to breast cancer?

 

Long-time users of calcium channel blockers have more than double the risk for getting breast cancer compared to women not using the blood pressure medications.

 

According to new research, postmenopausal women who use this type of antihypertensive medications for more than 10 years may have a risk of developing breast cancer. Although these blood pressure medications are widely prescribed, data regarding their long-term impact is sparse.

 

Overall, the use of antihypertensive agents was not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer—regardless of whether the use was classified as current, former or short-term.

 

However, the results from the research shows that, based on the type and duration of antihypertensive therapy, calcium-channel blockers had been seen to have a significant association with breast cancer risk.

 

In fact, menopausal women currently taking calcium-channel blockers for 10 or more years had two and a half times the risk of developing invasive ductal and invasive lobular cancers compared to women who never used such calcium-channel blockers and compared to users of other forms of antihypertensive agents.

 

There has been some evidence suggesting that some of these blood pressure medications may be related to breast cancer risk. The study of nearly 3,000 women found that among high blood pressure drugs, only calcium channel blockers carry the heightened breast cancer risk.

 

The results also indicated that other types of antihypertensive agents, such as beta blockers, diuretics and ARBs, were not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer — even when used long term.

 

However, several previous studies had investigated the relationship between blood pressure medications and breast cancer, and findings were varied.

 

Though at least three previous studies have hinted at associations between calcium channel blockers and cancer, there are a few studies that did not find a link.

 

Because calcium has so many vital functions in the human body, the fact that a drug affecting calcium dynamics could pose serious risk of developing cancer is not a surprise.

 

The changes in intracellular calcium concentration are also believed to regulate apoptosis as apoptosis — the programmed death of a damaged cell — is one of the body’s natural defences against cancer.

 

One hypothesis is that calcium channel blockers could prevent apoptosis in cancerous cells, however data on the subject is mixed and more research is needed.

 

The researchers concluded that long-term use of calcium-channel blockers might be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women. More research is needed to confirm this hypothesis and to evaluate the underlying mechanisms.

 

Despite the potential for concern raised by this study, the findings don’t warrant any modifications of clinical practice. This was a good study, but it doesn’t mean doctors should stop prescribing calcium channel blockers because it is an observational study.

 

Always consult with your doctor if you have any concerns about breast cancer risk and blood pressure medications.

 

Watch this Video – Breast cancer risk tied to popular blood pressure medication: Norvasc

 

Lower blood pressure without drugs—drop high blood pressure to 120/80 using these 3 easy exercises …

 

This post is from the High Blood Pressure Exercise Program. It was made by Christian Goodman Blue Heron health news that has been recognized as one of the top quality national health information websites.  This program will provide you the natural high blood pressure treatments, natural recipes to cook healthy meals and useful strategies to build a healthy diet with the aim to help you to maintain and stabilize your blood pressure.

 

To find out more about this program, click on How to Achieve Drastic Reduction in Blood Pressure Naturally