What is the Link between Size and Shape of Tonsils and Tonsil Stones Formation?

What is the Link between Size and Shape of Tonsils and Tonsil Stones Formation? Your tonsils protect the respiratory tract by making white blood cells and antibodies and by trapping bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other substances that may enter your mouth. However, they can become overrun with accumulated debris leading to tonsil stones formation.
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The palatine tonsils are two round lymphatic glands that are positioned on either side of your tongue at the back of your throat. Their primary function is to guard against potential infections before they reach the gastrointestinal tract or respiratory tract.

 

Your tonsils protect these regions by making white blood cells and antibodies and by trapping bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other substances that may enter your mouth. However, they can become overrun with accumulated debris leading to tonsil stones formation.

 

Your tonsils are made up of lymphatic tissue that is covered in pink mucosa. Nooks and crevices called the tonsillar crypts cover the surface of the tonsils.

 

These crypts can become clogged with foreign materials such as dead cells, bacteria, and food particles, especially in those who have large tonsils in relation to their throat diameter, such as children and adolescents. If this accumulated material is not removed quickly, it can become concentrated and harden into pale, irritating tonsil stones.

 

Tonsil stones formation is closely associated with the size and depth of a person’s tonsillar crypts. For example, individuals who suffer from chronic inflammation of their tonsils (known as tonsillitis) are the most likely to develop tonsil stones. Researchers suspect that this is related to the tonsils’ increased size and the infection’s exacerbation of the tonsillar crypts.

 

Although not all people with tonsil stones experience symptoms, the formation of tonsil stones is also associated with discomfort and bad breath in some cases.

 

According to a study from 2007 at the State University of Campinas in Brazil, tonsil stones formation were detected in 75% of tonsillitis patients who complained of bad breath, as opposed to 6% of patients with normal breath.

 

Most individuals who have tonsil stones formation, however, may not experience noticeable symptoms, and therefore may only discover their condition once several stones become dislodged in their mouth.

 

Although many people develop small tonsil stones frequently, only a few patients have large and fully hardened tonsil stones. If you suspect you may be experiencing tonsil stones or that your tonsils may be enlarged and at risk for further issues, see your doctor. He or she can conduct a physical exam and may recommend that you visit an ear, nose, and throat specialist for further evaluation and treatment.

 

Watch this Video – Natural Home Remedies for Tonsilitis, Tonsillitis Treatment at Home

This article is based on the book, “Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever” by Alison White, an ex-sufferer of tonsilloliths, also known as tonsil stones.

 

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This is a 7-day schedule to get rid of tonsil stones using natural remedies that are tried, tested and proven to work. If you are ready to take control of your health and to make the right decision regarding your tonsil stones, then click on Tonsil Stones Remedy Forever.

Which doctors may treat bad breath?

Which doctors may treat bad breath? Even if you are maintaining an effective oral-hygiene routine of brushing your teeth, tongue, and gums and flossing after every meal or snack, you may still be experiencing bad breath. If this is the case, to treat bad breath, you should see a doctor or a dentist.
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For those who suffer from chronic bad breath, also known as halitosis, a home oral-care routine may not be enough to treat bad breath.

 

Even if you are maintaining an effective oral-hygiene routine of brushing your teeth, tongue, and gums and flossing after every meal or snack, you may still be experiencing bad breath. If this is the case, to treat bad breath, you should see a doctor or a dentist.

According to the Academy of General Dentistry, over 90% of bad breath cases are linked to issues in the mouth, throat, and tonsils. As a result, seeing a dentist is often the wisest option to treat bad breath.

 

To treat bad breath, your dentist can perform regular cleanings and exams, and he or she can also conduct further tests to ascertain what parts of your mouth are contributing to bad breath. Generally, your dentist is able to treat the causes of your bad breath.

 

If he or she determines that your mouth is healthy and not responsible for bad breath, your dentist may refer you to your family doctor or to a specialist for treatment.

Alternatively, another illness such as diabetes, cancer, or a respiratory infection can lead to symptoms involving bad breath. For cases like these, you should see your primary healthcare provider to diagnose and treat these underlying causes of unpleasant oral odor.

 

Sometimes medications are to blame for causing bad breath. If you suspect this may be the case, ask your prescribing physician if the medication can be adjusted or if he or she can suggest other options to treat bad breath.

Bad breath in infants or young children may indicate an infection or an undiagnosed medical issue. In these cases, consult your child’s pediatrician or dentist as soon as possible.

 

For adults and children, taking proper care of your teeth and visiting the dentist at least twice a year are the simplest ways to avoid bad breath and other oral-health concerns.

 

Watch this Video – The Doctors: Dr. Bill Dorfman on How to Cure Bad Breath

This article is based on the book,” Bad Breath Free Forever” by James Williams. This special report contains vital information that will enable you to take control of your life, banish bad breath, save your sex life, career and personal relationships.

 

Never again will you suffer the humiliation of bad breath. Get yourself cleaner, fresher breath and a more kissable mouth. You will enjoy increased self-confidence and positive effects on your self-esteem.

 

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Health issues that may have caused bad breath

Health issues that may have caused bad breath - Bad breath, also known as halitosis, can be caused by a variety of conditions. Certain health issues can lead to bad breath, as well as other negative side effects. Health issues such as frequent respiratory infections and systemic organ illnesses are conditions that can cause chronic bad breath.
Click HERE to Discover How You Can Get Yourself Cleaner, Fresher Breath and a MORE Kissable Mouth

 

Bad breath, also known as halitosis, can be caused by a variety of conditions. Certain health issues can lead to bad breath, as well as other negative side effects. Health issues such as frequent respiratory infections and systemic organ illnesses are conditions that can cause chronic bad breath.

For some people, recurrent or severe respiratory problems can lead to bad breath. Infections or illnesses that affect the nasal passages, such as pneumonia and chronic sinus infections or sinusitis, can cause a bad smell.

 

This is generally a result of postnasal drip, which occurs when excessive mucus is produced during an immune response and accumulates in your throat or nose. The mucosal build-up harbors odor-causing bacteria and food particles in the back of your mouth and throat, causing an unpleasant smell.

 

In health issues like bacterial pneumonia, the lungs fill with liquid in a process known as consolidation. This leads to severe bad breath from the lungs and mouth as a result of high levels of bacteria and fluid.

Bad breath may also be caused by liver or kidney health issues. Late-stage liver failure can lead to a unique form of bad breath, also known as “fetor hepaticus,” which is caused by dimethyl sulfide.

 

Alternatively, chronic kidney failure is also associated with bad breath that smells fishy or ammonia-like. This form of bad breath is called “uremic fetor”; the smell is caused by an elevated urea concentration in saliva and its subsequent breakdown into ammonia.
Other symptoms often accompany these health issues that cause bad breath. These may include congestion, sinus pain, chest pressure, or an elevated body temperature.

 

The obvious solution to curing bad breath that is caused by an underlying medical issue is to treat the individual cause. This can involve antibiotics for a sinus infection or more extensive procedures for organ issues.

 

Improving oral hygiene through regularly flossing, brushing, and mouthwash usage is also important to limit the extent of medically caused bad breath and to prevent additional oral-health concerns.

 

Watch this Video – What Causes Bad Breath

This article is based on the book,” Bad Breath Free Forever” by James Williams. This special report contains vital information that will enable you to take control of your life, banish bad breath, save your sex life, career and personal relationships.

 

Never again will you suffer the humiliation of bad breath. Get yourself cleaner, fresher breath and a more kissable mouth. You will enjoy increased self-confidence and positive effects on your self-esteem.

 

To find out how you can do it, CLICK HERE