Terrible Vertigo and High Blood Pressure Link Revealed Here

Terrible Vertigo and High Blood Pressure Link Revealed Here - Even if you suffer from both vertigo and high blood pressure, you may not be aware there is a connection between the two. You might write each one off as separate conditions that need to be treated separately. But as with so many other conditions, a high percentage of people experiencing vertigo regularly also have high blood pressure. And the fact is, long lasting hypertension very often causes chronic vertigo, dizziness and lightshades. How? That’s the subject of today’s feature post. To learn more read on here to find out about the connection between vertigo and high blood pressure.
Click HERE to Discover How You Can Heal Your Vertigo and Dizziness Permanently in Just 15 Minutes

 

Vertigo and High Blood Pressure Connection

 

Even if you suffer from both vertigo and high blood pressure, you may not be aware there is a connection between the two. You might write each one off as separate conditions that need to be treated separately.

 

But as with so many other conditions, a high percentage of people experiencing vertigo regularly also have high blood pressure. And the fact is, long lasting hypertension very often causes chronic vertigo, dizziness and lightshades.

 

How? That’s the subject of today’s feature post. To learn more read on here to find out about the connection between vertigo and high blood pressure.

 

You see, vertigo is not a subject that should be taken lightly. It’s the third most common symptom in primary care and even more common among elderly. It’s also a condition with apparently many different causes but no cure (at least from the traditional medical system – more on natural solutions in a bit).

 

Vertigo is most often blamed on some kind of dysfunction in the balance system. Either the the inner ear, eyes or nerves are typical suspects. However, I have found that more often it’s caused by lack of blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain. This causes lightshades, vertigo and dizzy feelings.

 

Our vertigo and dizziness exercises have worked wonders to permanently cure vertigo by loosening up the muscles associated with balance, which both fixes misalignment between the eyes and the inner ear as well as increasing blood flow up to the brain.

 

High blood pressure, however, also causes lack of blood delivery up to the brain. When the arteries leading up to the head are constantly hit with high blood pressure, they harden and narrow and less blood can be delivered through them. This is the reason why high blood pressure increases the risk of stroke and heart attack.

 

So in essence, vertigo can be regarded as a big warning sign for stroke and heart attack as it’s an indication that the arteries running up to the head have begun to harden and blood flow is reduced.

 

You may think that a small reduction of blood flow is not such a big deal but think again. Although the brain only counts for about 2% of our body weight, it uses 20-40% of all oxygen we inhale. Even if we can live five minutes without breathing, our brain continues to receive oxygen we still have in our lungs and blood stream.

 

However, within 10 seconds of cutting off oxygen delivery to the brain, we lose consciousness. And brain damage begins to develop within seconds more. It’s the most important “nutrition” our brain gets.

 

So you can imagine there are serious consequences even if your brain is only slightly deprived of oxygen. Studies have shown that mice that received 85% of normal oxygen began to develop dementia symptoms within days. That’s how Alzheimer’s (again condition mostly associated with aging) has been linked to long-term lack of blood flow into the brain.

 

Another warning sign is if you experience tension in the neck. Hardening of the arteries and lack of blood flow leads to tension in the neck, jaw and other muscles surrounding that area. People compensate by physically tilting their heads, which leads to a misalignment between the eyes and the inner ear. This worsens vertigo and dizziness.

 

Watch this Video – Can you get vertigo from high blood pressure ? | good Health for all

What You Can Do If You Have Vertigo and High Blood Pressure

 

The good news is that new studies have shown that if you manage to lower your blood pressure using natural methods, diet changes, lifestyle changes or our high blood pressure program, your arteries will begin to soften up again, delivering more blood flow throughout the body.

 

Interestingly, the same benefits do not seem to appear when using drugs.

Whether or not you’ve high blood pressure in association with your vertigo, you should definitely check out our vertigo and dizziness program.

 

And if you do have high blood pressure, our high blood pressure program has helped thousands of people to drop their blood pressure down to normal- usually within a week. Learn more about this program here…

 

This post is from the Vertigo and Dizziness Program, which was created by Christian Goodman. This is an all-natural system that utilizes the power of exercises to permanently cure your vertigo and dizziness. This will help to eliminate tension and improve your blood flow and balance.

 

From this Vertigo Relief Program, you will learn to strengthen your tongue, achieve whole-body balance, relieve tension and enhance your overall well-being.

 

To find out more about this program, click on Vertigo and Dizziness Cure 

 

What is the Best Way to Cure Vertigo and Prevent Stroke?

What is the Best Way to Cure Vertigo and Prevent Stroke? Read on here to find out more about this Vertigo and Dizziness Program which consists of a set of specific exercises that help to dramatically increase oxygen-rich blood flow to the brain, which can cure vertigo and prevent stroke.
Click HERE to Discover How You Can Heal Your Vertigo and Dizziness Permanently in Just 15 Minutes

 

Cure Vertigo and Prevent Stroke: Is Your Dizziness a Sign of a Stroke?

 

If you experience a sudden onslaught of vertigo or dizziness that then passes, chances are you were suffering something called a mini-stroke.

 

A mini-stroke itself is relatively harmless, but because they’re almost always followed up by more mini-strokes and often a final big stroke, this is a serious issue that needs to be addressed.

 

But most of the time, symptoms like vertigo and dizziness do not necessarily indicate a stroke.

 

A Canadian research team and an American MD/Professor had an interesting debate in the January 2016 edition of the Annals of Neurology.

 

The Canadian team thought that too few people who visit the ER with dizziness go on to have strokes later, while the American professor believed that too many of them did.

 

This is obviously important, because if many people who complain of dizziness are suffering a light stroke and go on to suffer a more severe one, ER physicians will have to start using MRI brain scans on a lot more people who visit the ER with vertigo and dizziness.

 

This can become incredibly expensive, as millions of people visit the ER with dizziness or vertigo every year. In fact, since MRIs are so expensive, it could completely implode some countries’ medical systems.

 

The Canadian researchers examined the information of all patients discharged from ER departments in Ontario between 2006 and 2011 with a diagnosis of peripheral vestibular disorder.

 

Peripheral vestibular disorder is the name for a variety of inner ear and vestibular nerve conditions. It is the most common cause of vertigo.

 

They checked whether these people suffered a stroke within 30 days after their discharge from the ER.

 

Of the 41,794 vertigo patients, 76 (0.18%) had a stroke within the first 30 days of their ER visit. In other words, they probably had a light stroke, not peripheral vestibular disorder.

 

Those diagnosed with peripheral vestibular disorder were 9.3 times more likely to have a stroke in the next 30 days than similar people without vertigo.

 

But the Canadian team believed that, 0.18% (less than 2 in a thousand) of incorrect diagnoses are simply too low to start implementing widespread and expensive MRI scans on everyone presenting at the ER with dizziness.

 

In the same journal, Dr. David E. Newman-Toker from Johns Hopkins University used statistics previously unearthed by American researchers showing that three to five percent of people who visit the ER with dizziness have had, or will still have, a stroke.

 

Accordingly, he thinks more should be done to reduce or eliminate these mistaken diagnoses.

 

He argued that, with 4.4 million Americans visiting the ER annually with dizziness, three to five percent of mistaken diagnoses translates to 120,000 to 200,000 missed strokes per year.

 

Yikes! In fact, even 0.18% is 7,920 missed strokes per year, which is a lot.

 

Watch this Video – One Month Before Stroke – Warning Signs and Symptoms of A Stroke You Must Know!

The good news is that specific exercises help to dramatically increase oxygen-rich blood flow to the brain, which can cure  vertigo and  prevent stroke. Try these simple vertigo and dizziness exercises here…

 

This post is from the Vertigo and Dizziness Program, which was created by Christian Goodman. This is an all-natural system that utilizes the power of exercises to permanently cure your vertigo and dizziness. This will help to eliminate tension and improve your blood flow and balance.

 

From this Vertigo Relief Program whose purpose is to cure vertigo and prevent stroke, you will learn to strengthen your tongue, achieve whole-body balance, relieve tension and enhance your overall well-being.

 

To find out more about this program, click on Cure Vertigo and Prevent Stroke