Keratosis Pilaris Causes and Complications – What Causes Keratosis Pilaris to Flare Up?

Keratosis Pilaris Causes and Complications – What Causes Keratosis Pilaris to Flare Up?  Any skin condition that involves dryness or moisture loss can contribute to developing keratosis pilaris. Complications involving discoloration are usually the result of changes in the skin's pigment, although this is not common among keratosis pilaris patients. Additionally, superficial scarring can also occur in some individuals with keratosis pilaris.
CLICK HERE TO FIND HOW YOU CAN ACHIEVE CLEARER AND SMOOTHER SKIN IN AN EASIER WAY BY FREEING YOURSELF FOREVER FROM KERATOSIS PILARIS

 

Keratosis Pilaris Causes and Complications – Other Skin Conditions That Bring About Keratosis Pilaris

Keratosis pilaris occurs when small, acne-like bumps appear on the surface of the skin in rough patches. These bumps are generally located on the arms, thighs, buttocks, and occasionally the cheeks.

 

Individuals experience keratosis pilaris as the result of the buildup of keratin, a protective skin protein, in hair follicles. This keratin buildup creates plugs that prevent hairs from pushing through to the surface of your skin, which leads to unsightly, rough bumps on the skin’s surface.

 

Although keratosis pilaris can occur in otherwise-healthy individuals, existing skin conditions can predispose you to developing this disorder. The reasons behind the body’s buildup of keratin are currently unknown, but keratosis pilaris often appears to occur in association with other skin conditions or genetic diseases in some patients.

 

Any skin condition that involves dryness or moisture loss can contribute to developing keratosis pilaris. For example, many patients experience worsened symptoms during winter when humidity is low, as the harsh weather conditions can prompt the skin to experience moisture loss.

 

People with eczema (also known as atopic dermatitis) can be prone to the symptoms of keratosis pilaris, as their itchy, dry, reddened skin can be vulnerable to other skin problems.

 

Similarly, individuals with ichthyosis who experience long-term thick, dry, and scaly skin are also more likely to have keratosis pilaris as well. Although no clear method of causation has been discovered, keratosis pilaris is also frequently seen in those with xerosis, which involves symptoms like dry, irritated skin that is cracked or feels tight, especially after bathing.

 

Keratosis pilaris has also been associated with skin conditions that are related to allergic reactions and asthma, although this has not received much clinical attention yet.

Researchers have noted that keratosis pilaris is often observed by physicians in otherwise-healthy patients who are visiting dermatologists for the treatment of other skin conditions and complaints.

 

If you are experiencing a skin condition that is causing you concern or discomfort, see your doctor or a dermatologist to diagnose and to address your symptoms. He or she can suggest various therapies and over-the-counter treatments to alleviate your discomfort and to promote well-moisturized skin.

 

Keratosis Pilaris Causes and Complications – Possible Complications Of Keratosis Pilaris

 

Keratosis pilaris is a widespread skin condition, affecting an estimated 40% of adults and nearly 50% to 80% of adolescents worldwide. Individuals who suffer from this condition have tiny, bumpy patterns along their skin; these rough areas resemble permanent goose bumps or “chicken skin.”

 

Although keratosis pilaris is a common and relatively harmless skin condition, certain patients may experience potential complications that range in severity from minor itching to permanent scarring. If you are suffering from keratosis pilaris and its associated complications and do not receive appropriate treatment, you are at risk for permanent skin damage in the affected areas.

 

For some people with keratosis pilaris, the affected areas of their skin may demonstrate temporary discoloration. Complications involving discoloration are usually the result of changes in the skin’s pigment, although this is not common among keratosis pilaris patients.

 

Pigmentary changes are referred to as either post-inflammatory hypopigmentation or hyperpigmentation, indicating conditions where skin is either lighter than or darker than the surrounding tissue. As indicated by their names, post-inflammatory hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation generally follow a period of prolonged or temporary inflammation of the affected area.

 

Additionally, superficial scarring can also occur in some individuals with keratosis pilaris. In general, any scarring in these cases is the result of deep picking, overly aggressive treatment, or another source of inflammation.

 

Some patients may also experience a gradual loss of hair in their affected facial areas, especially when keratosis pilaris occurs around the eyebrows. Hair loss has not been associated with other affected areas besides the face, however.

Thankfully, these complications usually disappear with treatment. Keratosis pilaris rarely involves substantial complications, as it is primarily a cosmetic skin condition. If you think you may be experiencing keratosis pilaris or that your skin condition may be worsening, speak with your doctor or a dermatologist. He or she can suggest treatments to protect your skin and to reduce inflammation. He or she may prescribe a topical corticosteroid cream or refer you for multiple laser therapies.

 

Additionally, your team of medical professionals can direct you to the best at-home remedies, such as moisturizing twice a day or installing a humidifier in your home.

 

For more ideas on keratosis pilaris causes and complications as well as treatment, watch this video – How to treat Keratosis Pilaris (aka Chicken Skin)

This post is from the Keratosis Pilaris Remedy program created by Alison White. Keratosis Pilaris Remedy program is a step by step natural system through which you can achieve a smoother and clearer skin in the shortest possible time. It comes with a confidence-boosting skin cleanse that will help you in getting rid of the Keratosis Pilaris condition. 

 

You will also get a recipe for a home-made face scrub with this product that is not only very affordable to make, but also offer much more benefits as compared to the expensive products available in the market. 

 

The author (Alison White) has also included her special Keratosis Pilaris diet plan that includes some basic foods and make your skin to reborn and glow up like your younger days.

Furthermore, you will get the important information about the special ingredients that you should consider while buying any skin product. These ingredients can be proved very useful in eliminating the Keratosis Pilaris permanently. 

 

To find out more about this program, visit Keratosis Pilaris Remedy Forever

 

Keratosis Pilaris Treatment – Does Keratosis Pilaris Go Away?

Keratosis Pilaris Treatment – Does Keratosis Pilaris Go Away?Despite the strong genetic influence of keratosis pilaris and the inability to prevent it, following a regular skincare-treatment schedule can reduce your symptoms. Doctors advise using non-soap cleansers, moisturizing regularly with a rich and gentle cream, exfoliating with a gentle pad or cleansing cream, and taking warm showers instead of hot baths. Noticeable results can take weeks to months, so be patient and consistent in your treatment plan.
CLICK HERE TO FIND HOW YOU CAN ACHIEVE CLEARER AND SMOOTHER SKIN IN AN EASIER WAY BY FREEING YOURSELF FOREVER FROM KERATOSIS PILARIS

 

Keratosis Pilaris Treatment – Is Keratosis Pilaris Contagious?

Individuals with obvious skin conditions like keratosis pilaris are often concerned that their problem could be spread to other people with whom they come into contact. Because their rough, bumpy skin is visually apparent and cosmetically unappealing, patients and those around them may believe that keratosis pilaris is contagious. This, however, is not the case. Keratosis pilaris is a genetic disorder and is not transmitted to others by touch or by proximity.

 

Keratosis pilaris is caused by the buildup of keratin, a protective skin protein. It is not the result of any bacteria, virus, fungus, or other transmittable source of origin. The continual buildup of keratin results in the formation of small plugs in the opening of hair follicles, which leads to blockage and creates tiny, raised, bumps that are grouped in patches along the skin’s surface.

 

This creates the trademark spotty “chicken skin” appearance that is associated with keratosis pilaris. Skin with hair growth is the most commonly affected, such as the upper arm, thigh, and sometimes buttocks. In rare cases, the face may be affected as well.

Although this disorder cannot be transmitted through touch, some individuals are more prone to developing keratosis pilaris than others. This is usually because of genetic influences, environmental factors, and skin types.

 

For example, someone with chronically dry skin who lives in a climate that experiences harsh winters is much more likely to experience keratosis pilaris than someone who lives in a more-humid environment. Additionally, someone who has a parent with the condition has a one in two chance (50%) that he or she will inherit it.

 

That being said, anyone can develop keratosis pilaris. The condition is most common in adolescents and in children ages 10 and under, but it also affects approximately 40% of all adults as well. Symptoms often persist for many years and can worsen or lessen periodically.

Ultimately, keratosis pilaris cannot be given to someone else through contact or proximity, and you cannot catch it from another person. If you think you may be at risk for keratosis pilaris or if you are manifesting symptoms, see your doctor or a dermatologist. He or she can suggest at-home remedies and may offer prescriptions to reduce inflammation and to improve your skin’s appearance.

 

Keratosis Pilaris Treatment – Is Keratosis Pilaris Curable?

Keratosis pilaris is a common skin condition that affects nearly 40% of all adults, in addition to approximately 50% to 80% of all adolescents. Those who suffer from this problem experience small raised bumps that occur in patches along the surface of their skin.

 

Despite claims to the contrary, clinical research indicates that keratosis pilaris cannot be cured by any medical treatment or by any lifestyle alteration.

Studies demonstrate that “no cure or universally effective treatment is available” for keratosis pilaris. This is likely due to the condition’s genetic predisposition: because keratosis pilaris is inherited from one or both of your parents, it is unlikely that any treatment can negate the effects of such a strong genetic factor. Additionally, its genetic influence also means that keratosis pilaris cannot be fully prevented by any supplement, cream, or other treatment.

 

Sometimes, however, the condition clears on its own without extensive treatment. This is often the case for patients who reach mid-adulthood, as many people with keratosis pilaris report a dramatic reduction in their symptoms by age 30. Other individuals may experience lifelong keratosis pilaris with alternating periods of remission and exacerbation.

Although keratosis pilaris is cosmetically unpleasing, the condition is not medically serious and rarely poses any significant health complications. Despite the strong genetic influence of keratosis pilaris and the inability to prevent it, following a regular skincare-treatment schedule can reduce your symptoms. Doctors advise using non-soap cleansers, moisturizing regularly with a rich and gentle cream, exfoliating with a gentle pad or cleansing cream, and taking warm showers instead of hot baths.

Noticeable results can take weeks to months, so be patient and consistent in your treatment plan. Symptoms can return if you discontinue treatment: make sure you maintain a healthy skincare routine, even after your bumpy skin disappears.

 

If your symptoms do not subside after implementing these skincare options, see your doctor or a dermatologist. He or she can recommend alternative methods to combat any residual inflammation or irritation, such as prescription creams containing corticosteroids or retinol or procedures like chemical peels or microdermabrasion.

 

Please note that these treatments are alternative therapies: they may not be effective in all cases, and you may have to pay for them out-of-pocket.

 

To get more ideas on keratosis pilaris treatment, watch this video – HOW TO GET RID OF CHICKEN SKIN (KERATOSIS PILARIS)| DR DRAY

This post is from the Keratosis Pilaris Remedy program created by Alison White. Keratosis Pilaris Remedy program is a step by step natural system through which you can achieve a smoother and clearer skin in the shortest possible time. It comes with a confidence-boosting skin cleanse that will help you in getting rid of the Keratosis Pilaris condition. 

 

You will also get a recipe for a home-made face scrub with this product that is not only very affordable to make, but also offer much more benefits as compared to the expensive products available in the market. 

 

The author (Alison White) has also included her special Keratosis Pilaris diet plan that includes some basic foods and make your skin to reborn and glow up like your younger days.

Furthermore, you will get the important information about the special ingredients that you should consider while buying any skin product. These ingredients can be proved very useful in eliminating the Keratosis Pilaris permanently. 

 

To find out more about this program, visit Keratosis Pilaris Remedy Forever

Keratosis Pilaris Remedy- Does Keratosis Pilaris Go Away?

Keratosis Pilaris Remedy- Does Keratosis Pilaris Go Away? Keratosis Pilaris Remedy- Generally, you do not need to consult your doctor about treatment for keratosis pilaris unless your symptoms are making you concerned. Effective home-based treatments include various over-the-counter exfoliating cleansers, moisturizing lotions, or skin creams to soothe skin and to combat inflammation.
CLICK HERE TO FIND HOW YOU CAN ACHIEVE CLEARER AND SMOOTHER SKIN IN AN EASIER WAY BY FREEING YOURSELF FOREVER FROM KERATOSIS PILARIS

 

Keratosis Pilaris Remedy – What Is Keratosis Pilaris?

Keratosis pilaris is a fairly common skin condition that creates small bumps and rough patches on the body. These bumps and patches are usually white or red and are scattered across the cheeks, arms, thighs, and buttocks. Occasionally, the forearms and upper back may also be affected. Rare forms of ketosis pilaris can create bumps and rough patches along the eyebrows, face, and scalp as well.

This skin disorder affects approximately 50-80% of all adolescents and nearly 40% of all adults. It is most common in those with dry skin or among people who have an existing skin condition such as eczema. Individuals with keratosis pilaris experience tiny, spiky bumps that are rough to the touch.

For some people, this skin disorder can also involve itching and inflammation surrounding these bumpy areas.

 

These symptoms are caused by the formation of hard plugs within hair follicles by a protein in the skin called keratin. Once many of these plugs form, they create patches of bumpy, irritated skin that resemble “chicken skin” or permanent goose bumps. Keratosis pilaris is not contagious, but it does appear to run in families, as between 30% and 50% of patients have a positive family history for the condition.

Although keratosis pilaris can create uncomfortable symptoms, it is generally a harmless illness. Occasionally, however, it can create psychological distress in some individuals. The condition is displeasing in appearance, but it is medically harmless.

 

If you are experiencing keratosis pilaris, your symptoms may be relieved by using soap-free cleansers and gentle exfoliators to reduce dead skin cells. Even though many patients experience frequently relapses after initial improvements, the condition usually heals over time and may even completely disappear.

Generally, you do not need to consult your doctor about treatment for keratosis pilaris unless your symptoms are making you concerned. If you do pursue medical treatment, your doctor or dermatologist can suggest at-home remedies.

 

Effective home-based treatments include various over-the-counter exfoliating cleansers, moisturizing lotions, or skin creams to soothe skin and to combat inflammation. In more serious cases, your doctor may also prescribe a corticosteroid cream or a topical retinoid to control extensive inflammation.

 

Keratosis Pilaris Remedy – Connection Between Obesity and Keratosis Pilaris

Keratosis pilaris is a fairly common skin condition that affects all populations regardless of gender, age, or ethnicity. Individuals who suffer from this disorder experience hard, tiny bumps along the surface of their skin.

 

These bumps are often grouped in patches along the upper arm, thigh, and buttocks. Although all populations can develop keratosis pilaris, these symptoms have been associated with existing health conditions such as obesity.

According to recent research, obesity is associated with a wide spectrum of skin conditions and diseases, including keratosis pilaris. Studies suggest that persons who are obese have a higher risk of developing skin problems like keratosis pilaris because of the increased surface area of their skin.

 

That is, the larger a person is, the more skin he or she has along the exterior of his or her body. This increased surface area of the skin creates an elevated risk of skin disorders and also makes it more likely that any existing skin disorder will go unnoticed by very overweight individuals.

Obesity is closely related to the properties and functions of many body systems, including your skin. Among other potential side effects and risks, being overweight can impair the skin’s circulation, restrict its wound-healing ability, reduce its lymphatic function, and damage its collagen structure.

 

Obesity can also lead to other unpleasant and unattractive skin conditions besides keratosis pilaris, such as skin tags, painful fat tumors in postmenopausal women, increased production of male hormones, extra hair growth on the face, and obvious discoloration in affected areas.

Generally, keratosis pilaris can give skin an unpleasant appearance, but it is hardly ever medically concerning. As a result, for keratosis-pilaris patients who are also obese, the problems caused by their excess weight are usually more concerning than any skin problems they may possess. Keratosis pilaris often improves with age, but obesity can persist and create lifelong health risks if left untreated.

 

If you suffer from keratosis pilaris, especially if you are overweight or obese, speak to your family doctor about your concerns. He or she can suggest ways to treat your skin condition and can help you to develop an effective weight-loss plan.

 

For more ideas on keratosis pilaris remedy, watch this video – KERATOSIS PILARIS: Q&A WITH A DERMATOLOGIST| Dr Dray

This post is from the Keratosis Pilaris Remedy program created by Alison White. Keratosis Pilaris Remedy program is a step by step natural system through which you can achieve a smoother and clearer skin in the shortest possible time. It comes with a confidence-boosting skin cleanse that will help you in getting rid of the Keratosis Pilaris condition. 

 

You will also get a recipe for a home-made face scrub with this product that is not only very affordable to make, but also offer much more benefits as compared to the expensive products available in the market. 

 

The author (Alison White) has also included her special Keratosis Pilaris diet plan that includes some basic foods and make your skin to reborn and glow up like your younger days.

Furthermore, you will get the important information about the special ingredients that you should consider while buying any skin product. These ingredients can be proved very useful in eliminating the Keratosis Pilaris permanently. 

 

To find out more about this program, visit Keratosis Pilaris Remedy Forever